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Water soluble oils vs traditional oils

Hey all,
I want to move onto oils because I hate how fast acrylic dries and how it dries darker.
I was concerned about having to use turpentine and how to dispose of it and dirty rags and have just learned there is a water soluble oil paint. I am new to painting so still learning about all the paints.
Are water solubles just as good as traditional oils?
Are there any differences other than that you can wash brushes with water and add water to the water solubles?
I'd like the slower drying of oil without the harsh fumes and problem of disposing of turpentine and turpentine soaked rags safely and environmentally friendly.
Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • I use winsorandnewton Artisan watermixable colors. I mix them with linseed oil to get them smooth. If you mix them with water they seem to dry quite quick. Before, I used  normal oil paint. I think it makes no difference for the painting process.
  • edited February 8
    You may want to give Geneva oil paint, non toxic, no worries of fumes. There are more cleaning products available that are safer to use that are non toxic, yet powerful cleaners. I also recommend paper towels for clean up rather than rags, easier to dispose of immediately after every painting session, soak them well in water, place them in a plastic bag, seal it and I place it in the freezer until garbage pick up day. I don't recommend using rags. Water soluble paint are very good grade paint, I couldn't get the professional results that I was aiming for. I was using SDM (Slow Dry Mix) but the paint did not maintain in storage as well, but did not try just simple water method. I believe these to be very close to traditional oils.
  • Mario

    Love W&N wm oils.
    Less expensive.
    Mix with anything.
    I don't use water.
    Can mix with trad paints.
    Works well with Mark's SDM.
    Tube stock with SDM lasts two years in small airtight containers.
    Mixed value strings lasts about three months in small airtight containers.
    Opacity and transparency the same as trad oils.
    Consistency is less buttery, but not a problem.
    I can minimize or eliminate solvents as I choose.
    I can paint in artist's studios or in class settings without killing people.
    Easy cleanup and gentle on brushes.
    No spontaneous combustion risk, sore throat, streaming eyes etc.
    Studio setup simpler, with natural ventilation.
    Mark's restricted palette in wm works consistently and predictably as trad oils. 

    Denis

    BOB73
  • You don't have to use solvents, you can use walnut, safflower or linseed oil to make the paint more fluid.

    There might be a lot of overwhelming information from all of us here. This is a good place to start:
    http://www.justpaint.org/solving-the-solvents/
  • don't add water, the mixed colors will dry too fast on your palette. use linseed oil or walnut oil. You can still use water for clean up. Warm water works better than cold.
  • Thank you all.
    Much appreciated.
    I was concerned when I read that paper towels containing turpentine or linseed can spontaneously combust in the rubbish. I never use rags, always paper towels.
    I also heard you need to contact your local council to organise to dispose of rags/paper towels and turpentine. Seems like too much of a hassle. 
    I'll look to give water solubles a go and use oils to make them more runny.


    BOB73
  • I use water miscible oils, although I don't like the brand that I have (Windsor Newton).  Once I burn through these I will by Cobra brand which I hear are a lot better.  As far as this medium overall, they seem to dry quicker than regular oils (maybe that is brand dependent though).  I partially agree with Bob73.  I think for initial blocking or making an under-painting, mixing with water is okay, but once you get into the meat of it I would use linseed (you can buy linseed specifically for water miscible paints).  My process with them usually consists of the following: 1) draw on primed canvas, 2) block in restricted pallet under-painting with blue, black and white acrylic paint, 3) cover entire acrylic under-painting with clear gesso, 4) paint with oils (glazing in some areas).  

    Keep in mind this is not the Carder method of wet on wet, but it works.  Regardless the water miscible oils handle basically the same as regular oils.
  • JeffAllen said:
    I use water miscible oils, although I don't like the brand that I have (Windsor Newton).  Once I burn through these I will by Cobra brand which I hear are a lot better.  As far as this medium overall, they seem to dry quicker than regular oils (maybe that is brand dependent though).  I partially agree with Bob73.  I think for initial blocking or making an under-painting, mixing with water is okay, but once you get into the meat of it I would use linseed (you can buy linseed specifically for water miscible paints).  My process with them usually consists of the following: 1) draw on primed canvas, 2) block in restricted pallet under-painting with blue, black and white acrylic paint, 3) cover entire acrylic under-painting with clear gesso, 4) paint with oils (glazing in some areas).  

    Keep in mind this is not the Carder method of wet on wet, but it works.  Regardless the water miscible oils handle basically the same as regular oils.
    Hi Jeff,
    Thanks for the info.
    Is water miscible the same as water soluble?
  • JeffAllen said:
    It is the same.
    Thanks!
  • I mix my watermixable WN artisan with Gamblin solvent free gel and it’s worked fine (thinner paint and fries faster).  I still use the water to clean the brushes.
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