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Hardest thing about painting realism

For me, it’s placement. I can get away with a drawing that is slightly off, or mixed values that still need adjustment. But the biggest thing that gets me is placing the paint in the correct spot on the canvas. I think this is the hardest thing about the DMP method. 

Going from pallet to canvas. I also think this is what makes the artist though. This is where you create, and make your painting yours! The more disciplined artist will labor over placing each and every value while the more liberal artist will ignore these imperfections. Therefore art is a reflection of your personality and character. I think all art and artists are beautiful because of this (execpt maybe Botero, sorry!) anyway enough rambling, what is the hardest for you when creating art?
tassieguyedavisonEliza

Comments

  • edited January 8
    Painting is an incredibly complex process. What I find hardest is arranging objects in a still life or elements in a landscape to arrive at a good composition. But I agree, @mattyblue, that the way we put paint on - placement - is also really difficult but very important in terms of personal style.
    mattyblueEliza
  • This weekend, it was mixing just an orange value, I seriously thought I was color blind to orange I could not get there, but I carried on and got somewhere near - placement is absolute key, that I one lesson I have learnt over the past few months, get your value and put it in the right place, is half your battle
    great question and topic @mattyblue
    mattyblueEliza
  • I’d love to be able to get away with just placing a big dollop of paint where it belongs and leaving it in plein air whilst being in the moment, but until then it’s color mixing and DMP! I can dream right haha.. 

    @tassieguy it seems to me that composition is an art form on it own, that’s why I leave it to photographers and nature lol


    tassieguy
  • Boudicca said:
    Sometimes, it’s just getting started.....
    I can have a great resistance to getting started. Then, when I start, I can’t stop. I think that might be why it’s hard to start, knowing I’m going to be obsessed until it’s finished.
    I know what you mean, @Boudicca. I've had a few weeks off and have found it really hard to get started again precisely for the reason you mention.  I know that once I do start  it'll full on obsessive again to the point off exhaustion. But I started a new one today anyway. Really had to force myself though.  :)
    Boudicca
  • @Boudicca and Tassie I recommend the book called War of Art by Steven Pressfeld- it's a nice short read and focuses on the struggle you mention
    Boudicca
  • I'm in agreement with you @mattyblue - placing the paint on the canvas is what currently challenges me. Not just right colour and value in the right place, but controlling the paint consistency to get a nice consistent finish across the whole surface. Mixing is also challenging,  but getting faster with each session.
    Forgivenesstassieguymattyblue
  • The reviews of that book sound good, @movealonghome. I'll have a look at  a sample on my Kindle and buy it if the sample speaks to me.   :)
  • edited January 8
    Yes, @Roxy - getting a consistent finish across the surface is a challenge for me too. Part of it, I think, is subtle blending (which you do so well) but it's also about maintaining a consistency with the amount of medium used. That is, not to have the paint looking dry and chalky in some places and slick and glossy in others. It's something I'm trying to work on. This is probably not such a problem for those who can get Geneva paints because the medium is included and they are ready to mix and apply.  It's more of a problem for those of us who must make our own medium and need to judge the quantity of medium to add to the paint which will depend on its stiffness when it comes out of the tube. And the stiffness of the paint will depend on the brand of paint, the amount of pigment they contain and the varying drying rates of different pigments ... It's a bit of a juggling act for me.
  • @Boudicca and Tassie I recommend the book called War of Art by Steven Pressfeld- it's a nice short read and focuses on the struggle you mention
    I’ve ordered this, thanks for the heads up @movealonghome
  • This is off topic but Steven Pressfield wrote "Gates of Fire", a semi-fictional narrative around the battle of Thermopylae.  One of the best historical/war/novels I've read, gripping from the first sentence.
  • I also agree that stealing some composition ideas can be a good trick. Haven't done that yet but I plan to! Heh heh heh
    jswartzart
  • Hey, that's a damned good idea, BOB73. :)
    PaulB
  • @PaulB I loved Gates of Fire. It would make a great movie.  
    PaulB
  • If you draw a composition formulae like a golden mean or a triangle or a diagonal on a canvas then it will be easier to place the objects in the right place. Also the idea is to shrink things down a little rather than painting big. These will eradicate the problems that you are facing
    movealonghomeForgivenessRenoir
  • PaulB said:
    This is off topic but Steven Pressfield wrote "Gates of Fire", a semi-fictional narrative around the battle of Thermopylae.  One of the best historical/war/novels I've read, gripping from the first sentence.
    PaulB this is the monument of Thermopyles battle in Greece, just to trigger your imagination :)
    PaulBKaustavRenoir
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