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Brushes

Just started mixing paint on my first DMP project. One hour in and the head of the Windsor and Newton brush falls off. Any feedback on these "affordable" brushes? Other suggestions?

Comments

  • SummerSummer -
    edited December 2017
    I try to mix as much as I can with the palette knife first before I employ the brushes.  I find when I mix with brushes, which is unavoidable, I have to do so very deliberately and gently.  About the head falling off, bummer.  The only thing I can think of is that maybe the ferrule came into contact with something hot, like water, which melted or cracked the glue inside.  Hope this helps.
    BOB73Lucie
  • Freeman

    Acrylic paint encourages the artist to leave the brush sitting in a jar of water. The wood swells deforming the ferrule. When drying the wood shrinks a loose ferrule can part company with the handle.

    Similarly, soaking in solvents can destroy the glue holding the brush together.

    Mark has a good video on brushcare.

    Rosemary brand has quality brushes at reasonable prices.

    Denis

    BOB73
  • I've successfully re-glued ferrules but I wouldn't bother for a cheap brush. W&N aren't cheap, I try to save them.
  • I immediately switched to a flexible pallet knife for mixing, and I'm much happier. I seem to waste less paint as well.
  • I had this happen with a W&N brush recently. It hadn’t been sitting in water or solvent, was almost brand new- just crappy quality. 
  • It was the very first time I used the brush!
  • Freeman said:
    It was the very first time I used the brush!
    Ha ha, when it happened to me I just sat there in disbelief. We’re supposed to make paintings that will last at the very least a lifetime and the tools can’t even make it to the end of the painting.
    Flatty
  • I have used the brushes a couple of times now and I find them stiff. Should I have washed them before I painted with them?
    Renoir
  • yes, brusssshes have something in them to hold their shape from the maker you have to work them with a little solvent between your fingers. some just use soap and water but I use OMS first then linseed oil till they're pliable but springy.
  • I thought they just used gum arabic which you can remove by flicking through the hairs with your hands.
  • Buy Rosemary brushes !! 
    Really good quality. 
    edavisonMartin_J_CraneBoudicca
  • Freeman said:
    Just started mixing paint on my first DMP project. One hour in and the head of the Windsor and Newton brush falls off. Any feedback on these "affordable" brushes? Other suggestions?
    Could you re-glue the head of the brush? Maybe it´s not completely gone. 
  • I second Rosemary. Handmade, very affordable, long lasting, and highest quality. W&N isn't even close. 
    PaulBBoudicca
  • why do I always get this great advice AFTER I spent all my money on the wrong thing?
    BoudiccaKaustavRenoiredavison
  • SummerSummer -
    edited December 2017
    Just a reminder that it is also HOW we use our brushes.  Here is Mark talking about that:



    edavison
  • I just ordered a set of the ivory filberts from Rosemary. Can't wait.
  • Freeman said:
    I just ordered a set of the ivory filberts from Rosemary. Can't wait.
    My two ivory filberts just arrived.  While I haven't used them yet, they are silky smooth, and I wish I'd bought them earlier.  It was @Boudicca that reminded me to buy them, what a great suggestion, they have a completely different feel.

    They do come with a warning though, that ivory bristle and Gamsol do not play well together, so watch out.
    Summer
  • Why/how is Gamsol different than OMS?
  • SummerSummer -
    edited December 2017
    "Gamblin Gamsol Odorless Mineral Spirits. ... Gamsol is less toxic than other brands of OMS (Odorless Mineral Spirits), mineral spirits, or turpentine because the harmful aromatic solvent component has been removed."  Gamsol is an OMS.   It still contains harmful substances to humans and pets so I use all the same precautions as I do when I use turpentine straight.  Always a good idea to test brushes first with substances you will be using in your own studio even after reading the warning labels.  Gamsol is just one of Gamblin's products.
  • I like the softer Eclipse brushes (“Synthetic Mongoose“) as well as the Ivory ones :)
  • So I can't use an OMS to clean these brushes? I am paranoid now because I basically ruined my first set of new brushes in cleaning them. I guess I was too aggressive and they all got fluffy. I don't want the same fate to befall these new ones.
  • FlattyFlatty admin
    I have had dozen brushes in use for about a year and a half. Have yet to clean them. I soak them in artist grade safflower oil. I re-dip them every 10 days or so when not in use. I just wipe them off and go. 
  • I think that will be my plan.
    Renoir
  • You can clean them fine with dish soap (washing up liquid in the UK) and water. Works fine with Geneva, W&N, other brands, etc..
  • My Rosemary brushes arrived today! Very excited to try them.
  • Can anyone tell me how I would use this #1 sable brush that came with the workshop set I bought from Rosemary? Nice and thin, but it's so flexible that it doesn't seem like it will provide much resistance for painting a line. Is it just for fine in-fill?

  • You have two options with that brush: It's a rigger (I think) and it will be wonderful for painting long lines.  It is indeed very soft.  Try putting some nice wet paint on there and try a long curved line, it's good that that.  You basically drag it slowly in a line.

    Your second option would be to send it to me.  I love those.
    Juliannaedavison
  • Freeman

    That brush is a long rigger or liner. For painting straight edges, flowing curves and tapering branches and twigs.

    Denis

  • SummerSummer -
    edited January 19
    Short video about the rigger brush but if you invent new ways to use this type of brush, I hope you will share it with us.



    Julianna
  • Thank you all. @PaulB, @Summer, @dencal this will get its first workout this weekend. If I invent a new way of painting with it I will certainly let you know!
  • @Freeman ; - I have one from Rosemary & co that is a "comber" - if it is pointed, it is the rigger but if it is more flat, it may be a comber.  They are both lovely brushes.  I use my small comber for softening edges and anything needing delicate touches - Rosemary & Co make the most lovely brushes.  
  • Don't be too quick to say that a brush that falls apart is "cheap garbage". Remember that the handles are normally wood, and changes in humidity can simply cause them to shrink and loosen. Larger brushes often have a nail or two, but this can't be done on small brushes. I would simply suggest reassembling the brush with a bit of super glue or 5 minute epoxy (which will be waterproof).
  • :My only comment about brushes is that I must remember to only use brush dip for those size 0 or less. My second '0' brush has lost half it's bristles after cleaning with lukewarm water and mild soap  :'(
  • You are maybe pulling the bristles too hard as you clean or dry them?
  • @dencal, I am finally getting to use that rigger I got with my set of Rosemary brushes. Wow, it is amazing. I am using it to get the fine detail of the "hair" on the white lure in my current WIP. I am blown away with what it can do. Now if only I can keep up with it!
    PaulB
  • Folks

    Riggers and liners. Yes, for rigging on boats and lines anywhere. But also; straightening edges on wobbly shapes, slashing in highlight edges on trees and fences, thin branches and twigs, and smooth flowing curves.

    A firm edge loaded palette knife stroke.will trench a groove in the canvas, making a straight and easy path to follow with the liner.

    Sign writing, calligraphy, pinstripe work the list goes on ....

    Denis

    BOB73
  • After re-reading this thread this morning, I've become concerned that plein air painters brushes if exposed to sunlight too long could result in damage to the glue under the ferrule--especially the cheap ones.  I don't know if this is true, but I thought it might be worth a mention.  :)
  • Summer

    Thermosetting resins need about 400 Fahrenheit to melt. Even in Australia we don’t reach much above 120.

    I suspect that catalyst or copolymer resins are used in professional brushes, unaffected by heat.
    However, long soaks in solvents may be another story.

    Denis

    Summer
  • @Summer, the glue melting or coming apart is no problem. Collect the fibers or hairs that come out and dip the ends in a little Elmer's or Duco glue then stick them back into the ferrule one at a time with tweezers. That should work, right???
  • BOB73 said:
    @Summer, the glue melting or coming apart is no problem. Collect the fibers or hairs that come out and dip the ends in a little Elmer's or Duco glue then stick them back into the ferrule one at a time with tweezers. That should work, right???
    Sounds like fun.  The only thing I haven't tried yet.  :)
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