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New to painting need some advice.

Hey everyone.

Brand new to painting and I have a couple of questions I would appreciate some insight. 

1. Can I use a baking sheet made of metal as a pallette? Maybe wrap it in aluminum or plastic wrap.

2. I can't seem to find the Venice turpentine, is there a replacement or an online retail store?

Thank you everyone! 

Comments

  • I wouldn't use a metal baking sheet directly, because it will be difficult to clean.  Try to use glass, it's very easy to wipe clean.  I used a dinner plate for a while, which worked but glass is better.  You can get a cheap glass cutting board for $10 or less, for example.

    I wouldn't use aluminum foil or plastic wrap.  When mixing paint and moving it around, you'll probably want a stable surface that doesn't wrinkle or move on you.

    That said, you really can use anything you want that isn't porous.
    tassieguyFullmooncorp
  • Sennelier do a VT.
    http://theartshop.com.au/sennelier-venetian-turpentine-120ml

    http://www.sennelier-colors.com/en/Home_52.html

    I dont know where you are or whether they will ship to you but it’s a starting point

    Fullmooncorp
  • @Fullmooncorp Do you have something like a Goodwill near you?  Or a salvage store?  Our Goodwill or Salvation Army stores almost always have some old prints or some kind of framed art with glass on top - just take the print out and usually you'll have the nice cardboard underneath so you don't even have to worry about the tint!  It works great and super, super cheap.
    Fullmooncorp
  • Welcome Fullmooncorp

    A metal baking sheet could be used but requires a lot of cleaning and if there are scratches in the pan cleaning is harder. aluminum foil is OK to use as a palette too. Save the plastic wrap to keep the cookies fresh.

    Shiva Signature Imitation Venice Turpentine works fine  and is what Mark uses. It's available from Jerry's Artarama online. in the U.S.

    Fullmooncorp
  • Thank you everyone for the great tips! I have purchased some turpentine and will try some new mediums.

    I have purchased new lightbulbs for the room that im painting in. (6500k) Which will help a lot.

    Purchased my colour checker as well since i would like to use and keep one for life. Will post new updates. 
  • kamapigments in montreal ships VT
  • I have purchased new lightbulbs for the room that im painting in. (6500k) Which will help a lot.
    Mark recommend 5000K - 5500K.  Not sure is anyone has an opinion on whether 6500K is too warm.
    Fullmooncorp
  • kamapigments in montreal ships VT
    Im currently in Mexico, so I´ll have to see if they ship international.

    Thanks!

  • PaulB said:
    I have purchased new lightbulbs for the room that im painting in. (6500k) Which will help a lot.
    Mark recommend 5000K - 5500K.  Not sure is anyone has an opinion on whether 6500K is too warm.
    Yup, saw that as well. Im trying the 6k since ill be working in a very dark area (mostly at nights). Ill try them out see how it goes. If not ill switch to 5500k. thank you ;)
  • PaulB said:
    I have purchased new lightbulbs for the room that im painting in. (6500k) Which will help a lot.
    Mark recommend 5000K - 5500K.  Not sure is anyone has an opinion on whether 6500K is too warm.
    Yup, saw that as well. Im trying the 6k since ill be working in a very dark area (mostly at nights). Ill try them out see how it goes. If not ill switch to 5500k. thank you ;)
    My apologies if I'm belaboring a point, but a 6000K bulb is not brighter than a 5000K bulb, it's simply a different color.  Not much different as far as I can tell, but Mark was very specific about the color range.

    If you're working in the dark, then you might just need a higher power bulb.  I work in the dark too, and I have two 5000K LED bulbs, of 11w each, and that is enough for me because the lamps are right by my shoulders, but if the lamp were further away, I would need more powerful bulbs.
  • PaulB said:
    PaulB said:
    I have purchased new lightbulbs for the room that im painting in. (6500k) Which will help a lot.
    Mark recommend 5000K - 5500K.  Not sure is anyone has an opinion on whether 6500K is too warm.
    Yup, saw that as well. Im trying the 6k since ill be working in a very dark area (mostly at nights). Ill try them out see how it goes. If not ill switch to 5500k. thank you ;)
    My apologies if I'm belaboring a point, but a 6000K bulb is not brighter than a 5000K bulb, it's simply a different color.  Not much different as far as I can tell, but Mark was very specific about the color range.

    If you're working in the dark, then you might just need a higher power bulb.  I work in the dark too, and I have two 5000K LED bulbs, of 11w each, and that is enough for me because the lamps are right by my shoulders, but if the lamp were further away, I would need more powerful bulbs.

    Ahhh I see, thanks! I will swing by Home Depot and try 5000k or 5500k. Don´t want to start on the wrong side of the bed. 
    PaulB
  • Probably a good idea as 6000K could be a bit too blue in colour depending on the brand. Professional bulbs like they use in photography studios also have a 'Çolor Rendering Index''or CRI as well as the temperature. A value close to 100 means all colours appear accurate - I have one of these with a CRI of 90-ish. I believe some cheaper 5000K bulbs whilst being overall daylight in temperature can shift colours in undesirable ways. But if they are cheap you can just try a few and see. Its worth getting the lighting right though, otherwise when you take your painting outside to photograph it you might get a nasty surprise when you find the colours are all wonky.
  • The color and Britney are important. To get what I needed I use three of these bulb I bought a menards. If that helps you may already have what you need by now.


  • Found some 5500 lighbulbs and they are really nice colour, much warmer than the 6000k. 
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