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Help: Oiling Out or How to Fix Dull/Shiny Patches of Dried Oil Paint

I'm currently trying to figure out how to resolve some of the drastically different shiny/dull patches on a couple of finished canvases before varnishing them. Gamsol's website recommends a 50/50 blend of mineral spirits and alkyd, but I'm looking for any insight from other painters who use similar methods to the one's proffered by Mark. So here are my questions:

1) When you oil out your paintings, what medium do you use for the oiling out?
2) Is there any other methodology you use for fixing paint that has dried with uneven patches of matte and shiny finish?

Comments

  • Looke

    Welcome to the Forum.

    I have used linseed oil for oiling out, more recently walnut oil. Just a light application.

    It takes about six months for a painting to be dry enough for a final varnish. However, if you need to photograph, exhibit or present to a client the options are ti oil out or to apply a coat of retouch varnish when the paint is touch dry in a few weeks. 

    Gamvar is also recommended by some folks here as a final varnish applied at touch dry stage.

    In any case a spray pressure pack varnish is a good option that avoids disturbance of soft paint, loose bristles and the accumulating of dust, a problem with slow drying brush applied varnish.

    Denis




    Looke
  • SummerSummer -
    edited October 5

    @Looke

    I'm posting this in two post to make sure you see my response. 

    I use refined linseed oil on sunken colors.  I'm putting on the oil so I can see how to finish a painting because the adjacent colors have become sunken.  This also lets me see in advance how the painting will look after the final varnish coat.  Or, other times, I want to change the sunken color, paint over it with another color, so I wipe oil onto it with a soft lint-free cloth and a drop or two of oil to moisten it and paint over that area.

    I’d like to mention something I found out in the last few months that may tie into your question. I don’t oil out a painting completely so it will look good for a client or for picture-taking any longer. It seems the conservators have found hairline ridges of caked-on oil when the varnish was being removed for restoration. They seem to think that it is not possible to wipe off all the oil on a painting’s surface that has been entirely oiled out. And that the surface of the painting will only appear dry enough to varnish months later. The act of wiping with a cloth over the surface serves to compact the oil even further where ridges exist. But they do recommend using refined linseed oil on areas where color needs to be restored, that is painted over, and that these areas will dry completely if just the right amount of oil is used.


    Summer

    Looke
  • @dencal Thanks for the warm welcome Denis! I appreciate you reaching out to help. Question: when you refer to "spray pressure pack varnish" do you mean varnish dispensed from aerosal can such as the ones found at the following link: https://www.dickblick.com/products/winsor-and-newton-artists-spray-varnishes/

    @Summer Thank you for replying to me twice! I have two questions for you: 1) When you use your linseed oil to oil out the areas that need to be brought back to life do you apply a thin layer of linseed oil and then wipe it off, or just apply it and let it dry? 2) Do you cut you linseed oil with anything, such as mineral spirits.

    Thanks again to both of you, I have never used any online forum for help before and this has been a great experience thus far!
  • Also, for anyone else who happens to come across this thread in search of similar answers, here are some of the best resources I've found on oiling out and varnishing:

    Video Tutorial on Oiling Out by Gamblin: 

    Gamblin's Varnish page: https://www.gamblincolors.com/oil-painting/gamvar-picture-varnish/

    Winsor and Newton's Varnish page: http://www.winsornewton.com/na/discover/tips-and-techniques/other-tips-and-techniques/all-you-need-to-know-about-varnishing-paintings-us

    Winsor and Newton's Oiling Out page: http://www.winsornewton.com/na/discover/tips-and-techniques/oil-colour/oiling-out-to-brighten-dull-areas-na
    Boudicca
  • @Looke Mark has a video exclusively about oiling out a painting, worth a watch.

    Note that oiling out a painting is a temporary move that will let you see the color/value more accurately so that you may continue the painting, match a color, etc.  The oil needs to dry again before you varnish.
  • Question: when you refer to "spray pressure pack varnish" do you mean varnish dispensed from aerosal can such as the ones found at the following link: https://www.dickblick.com/products/winsor-and-newton-artists-spray-varnishes/
    Looke

    Yep! Thems the ones.

    Denis

  • SummerSummer -
    edited October 4
    Looke said:

    @Summer Thank you for replying to me twice! I have two questions for you: 1) When you use your linseed oil to oil out the areas that need to be brought back to life do you apply a thin layer of linseed oil and then wipe it off, or just apply it and let it dry? 2) Do you cut you linseed oil with anything, such as mineral spirits.
    I apply a thin layer of linseed oil to a soft cloth and smear it around solidly into the area I am going to paint over so it really doesn't need any wiping off the way that I do it.  The new layer of oil serves as fat over lean so after I add the new layer of paint, all layers can continue to dry.  I don't use anything to cut the oil such as mineral spirits.  This is just my way.  There are other product combinations that you may want to experiment with.

    Summer
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