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Painting over a painting

I started a painting maybe 4 weeks ago, covered the canvas with paint (oils plus linseed oil), wasn't sure how to proceed, set it aside and last night I painted over the painting (basic outline for painting). I had some 'bumps' on the original and a few of them, maybe 3-5, are now blistered and filled with wet paint. They are very small. 

I don't plan on making my masterpiece on this, but I don't want the whole thing to fall off in 6 months if I continue to paint on it. Last night it was slightly moist to the touch.

So my question(s) is/are: 
Can you paint over a painting?
How soon after the original painting can you paint over it?
Should I just can the whole project?

Thank you all.

Comments

  • You never know which one will be the masterpiece, would be unfortunate if it turned out to be a painting you really loved but was not sound.
    Renoir
  • SummerSummer -
    edited September 25
    I draw the line at blisters when painting realism.  Be it unpainted canvas fabric, paint, or varnish layers.  It may be a good example of why we have the fat over lean rule.  Those bottom layers must be allowed to dry especially if there are to be subsequent ones.  You may be able to scrape everything away and start over on the same canvas and think of the remaining coloration as a tone or stain if it doesn't look too bad.  I'd keep the first layer lean.  Summer   
    Renoir
  • Renoir

    If the whole thing is dry (six months), lightly sand off the lumps and proceed with your basic outline and follow the fat over lean rule. Don't attempt to seal with gesso. The risk is cracking and wrinkling.

    If the paint is still soft or wet a scrape and an alcohol soaked rag should get you back to gesso for the most part. But messy and not really worth the effort.

    Denis

    RenoirKaustav
  • @dencal I was starting to think along the same lines: wait 6 months until it thoroughly dries, then sand the lumps. It's a fairly large canvas (for me) so I don't want to waste it. Now to find a way to store all these paintings....

    I seem to be a learn by experience type of person. I've managed to accomplish all the mistakes this forum and Mark warns about! lol

    Thank you all for your input! 
  • @Summer said:  You may be able to scrape everything away and start over on the same canvas and think of the remaining coloration as a tone or stain if it doesn't look too bad.  I'd keep the first layer lean.      @dencal said:  If the whole thing is dry (six months), lightly sand off the lumps and proceed with your basic outline and follow the fat over lean rule. Don't attempt to seal with gesso. The risk is cracking and wrinkling...... I agree with both but scrape as much as you can now but still wait 5-6 months before trying to paint over it. You may still have to sand it but maybe not.
    Renoir
  • Be careful sanding an old oil painting. I know an artist who was sanding to save some money and he developed heavy metal poisoning from the cad red dust.
    Renoir
  • @pppullo That's frightening! I don't always remember to keep things safe, as bad as that sounds. And that is something I would not have thought of at all. Very important especially because I have allergy, sinusitis and allergy induced asthma! Thank you!
  • Yes, if it has lead white in it then it could be worse.. 
    Renoir
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