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Does anyone spray formaldehyde onto the backs of their canvasses?

SummerSummer -
edited September 7 in Painting
I use Rabbit Skin Glue, an animal byproduct, as a size on my linen canvasses to keep the oil from the primer and oil paints from rotting my linen.  During rainy season I probably should spray the backs of my canvasses to prevent bacteria or fungus growth from forming.  Does anyone here have any first-hand experience with this?  Or, know of anybody who has?  Should I wait until it happens, or spray those canvasses ahead of time?  Please do not suggest taking them down to the local mortuary and having them cremated--haha.  Thanks.

Comments

  • Summer

    How many of your canvasses exhibit Mold spots? Is this a consequential risk that warrants introducing a toxic and carcinogenic volatile organic carbon into your domestic space?

    I worked in a museum for a decade and during this time the fish department down stairs were rebottling their 10k specimens from formaldehyde to alcohol. Yuk and double yuk. 



    There must be safer and simpler treatments. Even a paper seal will prevent spore and insects.

    Denis

  • Summer

    What about using the most effective fungicide called clove oil? I'm sure you've heard of this product.

    ABSTRACT

    The effect of temperature, concentration and contact time on the fungicidal effect of clove oleoresin dispersed in a concentrated sugar solution at 21 and 37ºC, and clove oleoresin at 0.2 to 0.8% (v/v) was studied. The test microorganisms were Candida albicans, Penicillium citrinum, Aspergillus niger and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The fungicidal effect was enhanced at 37ºC; at this temperature short contact times (e.g. 1 min.) were enough to eliminate a microbial inoculum of 106 c.f.u./ml of C. albicans. Although clove oleoresin caused important lethal effect, P. citrinum and A. niger were more resistant. After 60 minutes, clove oleoresin dispersed (0.4% v/v) in concentrated sugar solution caused a 99.6% reduction of the initial population (106 c.f.u./ml) of  Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The fungicidal activity of clove-sugar on C. albicans, after 2 min contact, was similar to that presented by disinfectants commonly used in hospitals, such as povidone-iodine and chloroxylenol.




    A solution of alcohol and say, 2% clove oil sprayed lightly may be enough of a treatment. Refreshed every five years or so.

    If humidity was such a problem l would be backing the canvas with an acrylic antifungal paint.

    Denis
    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited September 7
    @dencal ;  Thanks, Denis, I'm going to pick up on your paper idea and cut to fit white foam board for each canvas.  I was thinking about diluting formaldehyde in water, wearing a particle mask, rubber gloves, special clothing, and spraying the canvasses outside and letting them dry out but was worried about them out-gassing for years to come without me even realizing it as they hang on the walls of our home.  Thanks for your input.  Summer
  • An acrylic anti fungal paint sounds even better.  Thanks.  As you know, I'm converting to aluminum substrates.  Is it any wonder!  And about time. 
  • Summer 

    Are you going to hot dry mount the canvas to the Dibond as demonstrated by Garry Kravit?

    Denis

    Summer
  • KILZ or similar primer with a mildew blocker built in. Zinzzer makes them too which I have used as a primer. 
    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited September 7
    dencal said:
    Summer 

    Are you going to hot dry mount the canvas to the Dibond as demonstrated by Garry Kravit?

    Denis

    I watched his YouTube demo last year and again tonight and it is something I will keep in mind if the method I am testing now doesn't work.  Thanks for reminding me of this.

    I wonder why more plein air artists aren't using Dibond or AlumaComp for substrates.  There are ready-made, canvas covered, or just plain primed.  Cheap.  Great variety of sizes and surfaces.  Easy to store.  Easy to order.  Easy to ship.  Easy to paint on in all kinds of weather.  And, they look good when finished. 

    Summer 
  • BOB73 said:
    KILZ or similar primer with a mildew blocker built in. Zinzzer makes them too which I have used as a primer. 
    Thanks.  I've used Zinsser products before and I have an oil primer on hand that I'm going to be using fairly soon so I will certainly look for their primer with mildew blocker.  I have to keep in mind that oil rots canvas so I'll have to think that through when the time comes.  :)  Summer
  • There is a product called "Camp Dry" for waterproofing fabrics. Don't know the chemical composition but it may be worth researching. It's a spray on application and it works well outdoors. water beads on the surface and anything that gets on wipes off easily. Works great on denim jeans for repelling morning dew from grasses/brush and  light rain.
    Summer
  • Summer: I've looked at aluminium and dibond but prefer expanded PVC form board as a backing support which is more rigid (Although thicker), lighter and cheaper.
    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited September 7
    Richard_P said:
    Summer: I've looked at aluminium and dibond but prefer expanded PVC form board as a backing support which is more rigid (Although thicker), lighter and cheaper.
    Thanks, @Richard_P, I'll take a closer look to see what you mean.  Summer

    Update:  I remember buying a few sheets of this product in black several years ago from Uline.  I first used it to back my photos on the photo stand in my studio which means I attached it to the easel that serves as the photo stand.  It wore out and I have replaced it with a sturdier plastic.  My last use, I use regularly as a backdrop when depositing checks to my bank from my cell phone.  I'll have to give your idea a try but I am concerned about its safety.  I see PVC warnings everywhere but I do like using this product.  Hmm.

    Had to remind myself what it can do:

    "Expanded PVC (expanded polyvinyl chloride) is a lightweight, yet rigid, expanded foam polyvinyl chloride. It is tough and versatile for many visual merchandising and signage applications.   Available in a lot of different colors and is a good substrate for digital and screen-printing, painting, laminating, vinyl lettering, and forming projects.  It can be sawed, drilled, bent, edge finished, and fabricated using ordinary tools."

    Thanks. 
  • SummerSummer -
    edited September 7
    BOB73 said:
    There is a product called "Camp Dry" for waterproofing fabrics. Don't know the chemical composition but it may be worth researching. It's a spray on application and it works well outdoors. water beads on the surface and anything that gets on wipes off easily. Works great on denim jeans for repelling morning dew from grasses/brush and  light rain.
    Thanks,@BOB73, very interesting looking product.  I'll take a look.  Summer

    Update:  I'll have my husband pick up a can this afternoon and give it a try.  Thanks.
    BOB73
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