Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

You can send an email to forum@drawmixpaint.com if you have questions about how to use this forum.

Start to Finish Method for a Painting

SummerSummer -
edited October 5 in Painting
    Folks. Here is my evolved start to finish method for a painting when I don’t order custom made art boards. Comments and observations are really welcome you guys.  Thanks.  Summer
  1. Stretch linen over stretchers and insert shims/stretcher bar keys. There are minimum holes in the weave of the linen in preparation for the next step.

  2. Apply 2 coats of sizing made of rabbit glue.

  3. Prime with Gamblin oil painting ground (ZINSSER resin primer on boards). Let dry.

  4. Sand.

  5. Prime with Gamblin oil painting ground a second time and let dry.

  6. Sand.

  7. Stain with Mark’s new stain recipe using a hand-held sprayer on a shop compressor,  let dry 2 days.

  8. Stain a second time using Mark’s new stain recipe with a hand-held sprayer on a shop compressor, let dry 2 days.

  9. Draw on Canvas with an oil-based pencil or Copic multiliner sp pigment-based pens.

  10. Paint with oils on canvas alla prima style from start to finish. 

  11. Take photo before paint dries.

  12. Let painting dry for 6 months.  Mark Calendar.

  13. For touch-ups, dead areas, oil out specific areas if first layer is dry to the touch with refined linseed oil.

  14. Paint on those ‘oiled out’ touched-up areas.   

  15. Reset 6 month drying period.

  16. Removable Varnish (not retouch varnish).


PaulB

Comments

  • I'm switching to op linen panels so I can skip steps 1-8 and 10. But what you described is generally accepted as one of the correct methods. I don't know about the industrial sprayer for this application unless you are shooting for "smooth as a baby's butt" support. the consensus says two coats of stain and I found one seems to work for me although I could see the necessity if you used a paint knife or wanted a super smooth painting surface. Also don't think fat over lean is a problem with alkyd tone for quickly applied second layer. Also don't think fat over lean is an issue for a second sprayed on coat. Oiled out areas get a pre-coat of oil which (I DON'T KNOW) would seem to add enough to fill the fat over lean rule. Bear in mind you have a lot more experience than I do so most of this is based on what I've learned on DMP. But I do like that Fat-Over-Lean concept... reminds me of bacon-wrapped sirloin steakettes.
    BarbaraSummer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited July 27
    Thanks so much for your response and answering both of my questions specifically @BOB73.  So relieved that I haven't done anything major to ruin my system.  I have edited the above post because I tend to call things by their nicknames.  What I used and use is a hand-held sprayer on a shop compressor.  It just feels like an industrial sprayer, thus the nickname--haha  And, I don't always do the three prime coats.  Sometimes just two.  Gamblin says that two are sufficient, but I'm going to try your one next time.  What I was really worried about was not adding extra oil in that second coat of stain.  Adding oil after oiling out does seem to be redundant.  Now that that is settled, some of my colors are sinking in and I have to figure out why.  At least I know that it isn't the canvas.  Bacon-wrapped sirloin sounds good.  Hmm.  Summer     
    BOB73
  • SummerSummer -
    edited July 28
    I guess, in summary, then, there are three times when I put paint over other paint where I tend to not notice the fat-over-lean principle.  1)  Where I oil out an area I'm about to lay new paint on, 2) where I begin an alla prima painting on a dried stained canvas that used regular or alkyd oils in that stain, and 3) where I stained a canvas with regular or alkyd oils twice putting a second layer over a first, but didn't add oil to the second coat.  I don't want to overlook something that will cause the sinking-in of colors or worse, delamination of the paint-film layers, down the road.  HopeBOB73 and I have helped a few on DMP with this issue.   :)   Summer
  • Should have mentioned that I assumed the stain was the Mark Carder Recipe. It starts out with a lot more OMS than what you would use as a color in your paintings.
    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited July 27
    Thanks everyone for giving me a reason to organize my thoughts.  Sometimes organizing my thoughts like this helps me realize where the time goes.  Before Mark Carder, this forum, and the internet, I hate to remember what I painted on.  It bordered on the surfaces used by the cavemen at Lascaux.  Thanks everyone for taking a look and @BOB73 for taking the time to respond.   :)   Summer 
  • dencaldencal -
    edited July 27
    Summer

    Thanks for you detailed process and workflow description.

    The sinking you identify is little to do with the support, perhaps the gesso if chalky.
    Common causes: an over-absorbent surface, using too much solvent, or not enough medium. Using the ‘oiling out’ technique can give the painting a new lease of life.

    The other sinking theory is that the evaporation of volatile components (solvents) changes the surface texture and reflective properties, particularly noticeable in darks and earth tones.

    I take sinking to be a natural part of the scheme and just deal with it. I'm sure you do to.

    Denis


    Summer
  • @dencal ; Denis, you will be happy to know that your words are sinking in!  :)  I really appreciate your overview especially at this time when I'm researching and resolving this issue once and for all.  Summer 
  • dencaldencal -
    edited July 27
    Summer

    Great. I had a growing sinking feeling.

    Have a look at this comprehensive article.



    Denis

    BOB73SummerBoudicca
  • @dencal ; Denis.  What a find!  I'll be reading and studying this over coffee today for sure.  You've made my day! 
  • Justpaint contains a ton of great information. :)
  • SummerSummer -
    edited July 27
    Richard_P said:
    Justpaint contains a ton of great information. :)
    Yes.  I've just noticed.  Learning a lot from Sarah Sands today about sinking-in of oil paint colors.  Thanks.   :)  
  • From your list the only thing I'm not sure about is using Rabbit Skin Glue. Not sure how recommended that is for flexible supports now?

    Are we going to see more of your paintings soon? :)
    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited July 28
    Richard_P said:
    From your list the only thing I'm not sure about is using Rabbit Skin Glue. Not sure how recommended that is for flexible supports now?

    Are we going to see more of your paintings soon? :)
    Thanks for asking.  Sometimes I need to be reminded to post something.  Soon.  Yes, soon.  However, you should probably be grateful that I am not boring you with my paintings--haha.  Keep in mind that, excluding the current state of technology, years ago, I had an art career for about 7 1/2 years, and it wouldn't be fair to take up time and space on DMP when others are just starting out and need our help.  In the meantime, as you know, I'm searching for a signature style, for a eureka moment to occur.  While I'm waiting for that, I'm learning other technological aspects of the art world that are equally important in our age today.  I don't think that I'm alone here--the searching.  I see a lot of artists on this treadmill advancing little by little.  My husband says to me: "You're not ready yet."  And, I agree.  I think of DMP and my new studio as a way of life, and I can hardly wait to post something significant and worthwhile now that I have a studio and one painting posted to date.  I hope that I am allowed to stay on DMP having posted only one painting?  I suspect, but hope not, that some members have dropped DMP because they felt they weren't posting enough paintings.  I myself feel guilty about it, but it is something I have to live with because along with the guilt, I am still very much a student in this new age of art and technology and I learn a lot by just being a contributing member of sorts.  :)

    About the RSG on flexible supports:  I'm not seeing any adverse effects.  I'm careful to make sure the linen weave has no holes when held up to the light beforehand.  One disadvantage of painting solely on art boards is that shipping large art boards are costly.  I like painting on both framed linen and linen on art boards but I'm also experimenting with aluminum and constantly on the lookout for nylon substrates in the future.

    Now back to Sarah Sands and justpaint.org-- :)  The posts are particularly enlightening.  Summer  


  • The colour sinking phenomenon is scary. I've been doing 4 coats of white gesso then a final coat of 60% gesso 40% black acrylic paint. I wonder if this will make the gesso less absorbant in a good way. I guess I'll know in 6 months.

    First couple paintings I didnt sand until someone mentioned how rough the surface looked so now I've started sanding.
  • SummerSummer -
    edited August 2
    Your experiments with the sanding and gesso with black acrylic sound interesting.  I hope that you will write about it here in six months time.  I've had letters from old clients telling me about sculptural pieces having gone through interesting changes.  Steel surfaces changed in patina, wood and and glue pieces expanded and contracted with the weather, fibers sagged and settled in.  Don't be surprised if five years from now your portrait will look better than it does now--although I don't see how it could look any better.  It looks great!   :)  
  • I guess guys get gesso grounds since before Michaelangelo painted the Sisteen Chapel fresco. I still don't really understand the science of painting in oils over water bound gypsum Gesso. My experience with painting, not oil painting of pictures on canvas, but painting with oil based paints on wood, metal, leather, fiberglass and other surfaces tells me that would be a bad idea but history it seems proves it is a sound ground. I'm just prejudicest against gesso. Although I used it a lot with acrylics. I also don't like sanding so I apply paint with different ways than a bush including steel wool, squeegees and rags. I don't have any surviving samples to show you but hope to have my studio established soon as I am starting to suffer the same guilt Summer speaks of except she has no reason to feel guilty.
    Summer
  • @Summer When you oil out your paintings, what medium do you use for the oiling out? I'm currently trying to figure out how to resolve some of the drastically different shiny/dull patches of a couple finished canvases before varnishing them. Gamsol's website recommends a 50/50 blend of mineral spirits and alkyd. I was just wondering what you used since you are at least familiar with the alla prima style and mediums recommended by Mark. Thanks!

  • SummerSummer -
    edited October 5

    @Looke

    I only use refined linseed oil on areas where color needs to be restored.  There are two reasons usually.  Sometime I just want to continue a painting and need to see what the sunken colors really look like, and will look like when the painting is completed and varnished.  The other reason is I want to change the sunken color with another color and I need to prep it by moistening it which I do with RLO.  There are other methods but I have found plain refined linseed oil the simplest and most trustworthy.  I especially avoid retouch varnish as this creates problems for conservators and restorers down the road.

    I’d like to mention something I found out in the last few months that may tie into your question. I don’t oil out a painting completely so it will look good for a client or for picture-taking any longer. It seems the conservators have found hairline ridges of caked-on oil when the varnish was being removed for restoration. They seem to think that it is not possible to wipe off all the oil on a painting’s surface that has been entirely oiled out. And that the surface of the painting will only appear dry enough to varnish months later. The act of wiping with a cloth over the surface serves to compact the oil even further where ridges exist. But they do recommend using refined linseed oil on areas where color needs to be restored, that is painted over, and that these areas will dry completely if just the right amount of oil is used.

    Summer
Sign In or Register to comment.