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A New Covered Studio Palette



I am thinking of buying this box to convert it into a studio palette. My intention is to keep mixed and unmixed paints away from air. Also, after the present lot of paints I cannot continue with Mark's formula because of our new baby in the house. But I can paint with tube paints straightaway. i can mix a drop of oil if need be. I am used to painting like this as well.

I read in a Watts Atelier material that if you keep a small amount of clove oil inside the closed box palette, it will keep the paint fresh inside. I am gonna test that plus it is easy to keep it in the freezer during summer. This looks like A4 size which is ok with me. If I need more mixing space then I have four additional palettes.

https://www.flipkart.com/pinzo-1-compartments-plastic-transparent-slim-paper-document-storage-box-built-in-clip-lock/p/itmeux9fnqn3anyz?pid=DKOEUX9FKVRGYQWH&otracker=wishlist_1_DKOEUX9FKVRGYQWH
Bancroft414ForgivenessKRYS
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Comments

  • I've used Tiger A4 Slim Tuff box for my palettes for about a year:


    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Tiger-Slim-Tuff-Storage-Case/dp/B00B2L0P8S

    KaustavKRYS
  • are they air tight? the catalogue doesn't say so.
  • edited August 4
    @BOB73 if the box is covered, it does the work. if anyone wants super-airtight then they can seal the gaps with scotch tape.
    BOB73
  • It's not airtight but my paints were still wet after 3 weeks when they contained clove oil.
    KaustavBOB73ForgivenessRenoir
  • In addition to keeping the palette wet, this has the benefit of keeping all the airborne dust and fluff off the palette.

    When my palette is out for two weeks, it picks up all that stuff.
    KaustavRenoirForgiveness
  • RoxyRoxy -
    edited July 28
    Here's my homemade solution. Glass palettes blue tacked to a wooden board, with covers made of acrylic sheet and super glue. I just bought a bulk lot of the small plastic clip-top jars in the 2nd photo for keeping paint fresh.
    KaustavForgivenessIrishcajunKRYS
  • Roxy

    Looking good. Snap Caps.

    Denis

  • Yeah. Wonder where I got that idea from?
  • I have a strange feeling here...we are not that unique even in the field of arts! :o
  • BRILLIANT! I can make one like that. Great Idea thanks.


    Kaustav
  • edited August 4
    I have 2 glass pallets sitting in wooden frames from old cabinet, stack on top of the other and a sheet of glass over the the top one, keeps my paint for to 2 1/2 weeks, almost 1 1/2 weeks at the most in this very hot and humid weather. The plastic box appears more efficient, for such little cost. Love those snap caps! even more so in an additional seal-able plastic container.
    dencalKaustav
  • edited August 24
    Here it is. I colored it with black acrylic paint, gesso and burnt sienna outside. Now I can use both the surfaces inside which provides enough room.



    Boudicca
  • Looks good! Are you mixing directly onto the plastic or have you stuck glass there too?
  • @Richard_P directly onto the palette. I don't need to worry about paint drying on plastic because I scrape wet paint and put that pile in a plastic jar. Will be using that grey-green paint for various purposes including painting.
  • The problem is plastic scratches easily when scraping
  • Regular paint inside the palette with a piece of cotton soaked in cloved oil remained fresh for two weeks and it seems paints will remain so for another week. Clove oil forms some sort of moisture conditioning inside the box.
    Boudiccatassieguy
  • I must get some clove oil. I have a sealable plastic palette with a rubber "O" ring and I keep it in the fridge when not using it. The paint stays useable for at least a week, maybe two, depending on the colour. However, if I get some clove oil to add to the palette it seems I could extend that time even more. I'm going to try it. The reason it works, as I understand it, is that clove oil is a powerful anti-oxidant and since oil paint dries by oxidation rather than evaporation paints can be kept useable for as long as oxidation can be prevented.
    Kaustav
  • @tassieguy what is the average temperature in your place these days? If you use clove oil then there is no need to keep the closed box inside the freezer. If your place is cold then (end of winter?) - no problem. It is working fine in 33 degree Celsius.
  • edited August 22
    That's great, @Kaustav because sometimes I forget to put it in the fridge. Winter's not a problem because it gets  down to 2 or 3 degrees at night or even below zero. But in summer, if I forget, it won't matter if I have clove oil. :)
  • @tassieguy that's great but can't get as hot as India I suppose. B)
  • No, not as hot as India, @Kaustav. The highest temperature in Tasmania was 41 degrees C in 2013. And that was too hot for me.  B)
  • tassieguy said:
    I must get some clove oil. I have a sealable plastic palette with a rubber "O" ring and I keep it in the fridge when not using it. The paint stays useable for at least a week, maybe two, depending on the colour. However, if I get some clove oil to add to the palette it seems I could extend that time even more. I'm going to try it. The reason it works, as I understand it, is that clove oil is a powerful anti-oxidant and since oil paint dries by oxidation rather than evaporation paints can be kept useable for as long as oxidation can be prevented.
    I'm surprised you haven't been using clove oil already since some of your paintings are very large.
    Renoir
  • @Richard, because I rarely blend it hasn't really been an problem. The real issue for me is that I don't like to waste time and paint by mixing up a lot of colours only to have them dry on the palette before I can use them.
  •  Hope this isn't too far off topic but I read yesterday of a person who sealed up his paint from his pallet put in a plastic bag on a plate and put them in his freezer - then when he wanted to use them again he took them out a couple hours before use and they would be thawed out has anyone tried this with Geneva paints?
  • They keep for months refrigerated but from an archival perspective I think freezing is inadvisable.
    Kaustav
  • BOB73BOB73 -
    edited September 8
    referring to how long paint mixed with SDM will last...I found out: at least two and a half years in the refrigerator 
    http://forum.drawmixpaint.com/discussion/4124/sdm-04-10-13#latest
    cadia
  • Another question regarding this comment,
    " I cannot continue with Mark's formula because of our new baby in the house."
    Marks paint is not toxic ~ correct? Why this then?
  • Mark's Geneva paints are made without solvents. The Formula (slow-dry medium) referred to is the one found in the Supply List that can be added to other brands of paint to make them behave like Geneva but this formula includes solvent (mineral spirits) and clove oil among other ingredients and babies can be sensitive to aromatics. The sensitivity can be made worse by high heat and humidity.
    Kaustav
  • @tassieguy
     and @Kaustav

    I purchased Clove Oil months ago to put a drop on cotton ball and store my 12 x 16 inches wooden palette in the Masterson plastic palette storer. 

    My question to both of you is - does the Clove Oil in the cotton ball make the paint and storage box smell permanently?

    I'm a migraine sufferer and work without mediums as strong smells set me off. I've been scared of trying to Clove Oil because I'm worried that it will taint my wooden palette (New Wave) and storage box. Thoughts please?
  • I'm not sure, Veronica, I haven't tried it yet either but if it's only on a cotton ball and not mixed in with the paint you should be ok, especially if your space is well ventilated.
    Veronica
  • It won't affect a glass palette. If the clove oil isn't in direct contact with the wood I don't think it would affect that either.
    Veronica
  • SummerSummer -
    edited September 23
    @Veronica ; I'd be careful to use only a drop or two of clove oil at the most on the cotton ball.  But only because excess liquid clove oil will migrate to the other paints on the palette.  Just keep the two separate.
    Veronica
  • I hope this is not too off-topic, but it was mentioned:
    @cadia ;I have started to take my daily palette, cover with plastic wrap, and place in the freezer overnight. I have found that the paint keeps very well this way. At this time, I use W&N or Gamblin paints with linseed oil as a medium. I have some mixed color that has been on this palette for 21 days and is still fresh with no skin. I also use my palette knife to stir up each little pile every day so that it does not separate or become hard.
    If I've used up all the color, the stain dries to the palette and I just use some safflower oil on a paper towel to clean up the surface so I can use the space for another mixture. 
    The key seems to be cold and well-covered. I've really enjoyed this as it means I don't have to clean my palette every day or even make new mixed paint every day. There's a rose color on my palette I've used for three paintings now!
  • It makes sense, Oils oxidise with oxygen, but also with energy from light and heat. So in a dark freezer isn't going to oxidise much slower. The only problem is most people don't have a 2nd freezer for palettes and paint.
    Kaustav
  • @RichardP - is it the odors from the paint that would be dangerous for food? We have a very small freezer upstairs that, for all intents and purposes, is used for the ice maker and some ice cream and nothing else. I put the palette in there on a separate shelf. The rest of my frozen foods are in a upright deep freezer downstairs. So the paint does not come in contact with the food at all. Do you have insight on this?
    Also, you mentioned that oils oxidize with the energy from light and heat. I wonder if I experimented with just covering and keeping it dark what the outcome would be. When I used to only cover it, the paints lasted a day or so.
  • edited September 23
    @Renoir If you are not using solvents then it's not necessarily dangerous, but I would be concerned about the strong smell of cloves especially tainting any food that's in there. In might not be an issue and it sounds like you've not noticed any smells from the paint on the food?

    You'd probably find that a palette in the dark would oxidize slower than one in the light, but I think the temperature it's in has a bigger effect.

    Some artists immerse their entire palette in distilled water (so no oxygen) to keep it fresh. But putting it in a fridge or freezer in an airtight box sounds enough for me :)
  • @Richard_P Oh, thank you for that. I have not yet used the clove oil, I get severe headaches from strong odors. I also don't use the solvent in my paints, at least not yet. I also prefer not to use solvent, except for staining canvas. So it sounds like paint with linseed oil as medium, when covered properly can be put in the freezer. That alleviates a nagging little concern I had. Thank you!
  • Linseed oil shouldn't be a problem as far as I know.

    If you don't like strong odours (and clove oil is pungent) then you could perhaps look at paints that dry slower because they are bound in safflower oil (Sennelier) or Walnut (M. Graham)
  • SummerSummer -
    edited September 23
    Richard_P said:
    Linseed oil shouldn't be a problem as far as I know.

    Just my two cents: Linseed oil is extracted from flax seeds.  Flax seeds are a food.  I have 2-3 T. of flax seeds in a health shake every day.  So you are essentially putting food in the refrigerator/freezer, no problem.  (Linen is made from flax seeds so you could put that in the fridge as well--haha.)  Summer   
    RenoirKaustav
  • Yes I agree Summer. The same with Walnut oil and Safflower Oil. :)

    I was thinking more of the smell contaminating any food though really
    Summer
  • Hi everyone, thank you to all that contributed, much appreciated.

    I have some glass palettes which I will paint today to my canvas colour as use that in my Masterson storer with water. I don't like the feel of the knife on glass, and much prefer wood but let's see how that goes.

    I opened the Clove Oil bottle again this morning and thought, nope, really can't do this!  :s :#
    Summer
  • @Veronica Sorry for this late reply. I am using a plastic box. When I keep the paint inside with clove oil, the odor becomes extremely strong. I don't have any problems with clove but the strong smell puts me off as well. But I have to use it anyway because of the extreme climate in Delhi.
    But if the temperature in your place is lower and if you keep the paint inside the box away from air it will certainly help.

    One thing I noticed was when the clove oil loses its power after 3-4 weeks, there is no smell in the box.
    Veronica
  • Thank you @Kaustav, good to know. I'm creating some palettes from marine plywood for art school and will test it out with this to see if I can work with Clove Oil and if the wood takes on the smell, and bothers me during painting etc. (instead of risking ruining my New Wave wooden palette).

    I tried using a glass palette (specifically for storing with Clove Oil) and I really don't like the surface and glare etc.
    Kaustav
  • My solution .. I made a wood cover for my row of paints .. it goes down over the glass on three sides so it locks in place .. a cotton ball is in the middle of the row with a few drops of clove oil .. this setup works well .. but since dust is an issue where I live in the high desert .. I might want to make a cover for the entire palette sometime :)

      


    PaulBanweshaKaustav
  • Nice studio space, and an even nicer view.  Are you painting that view?
  • Thanks Paul .. I haven't painted the view yet .. although this winter I might.  I live just outside Capitol Reef NP .. very rural and spectacular.
  • @clearlightstudios lovely place, remember it well.  You are kind of obligated to paint it, it's unparalleled.
    Kaustav
  • @clearlightstudios, So you can just put clove oil on a cotton ball and that will slow down your drying time on your palette? Very nice view.
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