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Plein Air painting

edited July 16 in Painting
I am going to a plain air workshop in Sun Valley, Idaho in a few weeks. I'm extremely excited- a dream come true! Does anyone have any plain air experience and tips? I have purchased a guerrilla painter box and I'm wondering how the paint on the palette stays fresh inside the box since it is not air tight? I guess you are supposed to clean the palette after each painting session? What if I want to paint frequently on the road? How do I keep paint fresh and brushes, tools clean? Maybe I should switch to water mixables while traveling? Thoughts?



Kaustav

Comments

  • Good luck and have fun. If it was me going into the wilderness I'd also have a .40 caliber double stack and extra ammo.
    Bancroft414jennie_artWeatherford
  • jennie_art

    Put all your used brushes in a zip lock bag with a teaspoon of brush dip. Roll it up with a rubber band.
    Alternately a three inch PVC pipe with screw on end caps makes a great brush holder, perhaps one for dry and one for wet.

    Wet wipes, rubbing alcohol, citrus solvent, walnut oil and clove oil are all good to clean up and keep things from drying out.


    Denis
    Bancroft414jennie_artBOB73
  • jennie_art

    Use the search box at the top right of this page, search for Pochade to see all the plein air stuff.

    Denis

    jennie_art
  • edited July 17
    Brush dips, safflower oil, walnut, baby oil, clove oil, turpenoid, mineral spirits, galkyd, liquin blah blah blah. Soo many, many liquids involved and I'm lost. Can someone just break it down for me? Tell me what to use to thin my oil paints (I don't have geneva yet) and what to clean my brushes with. I will definitely start using a brush dip instead of cleaning so thoroughly as well!
  • SummerSummer -
    edited July 19
    @jennie_art ; I assume that you are already a painter and understand the basics and and so won't find plein air painting too intimidating.  Good luck.  Let's see, in my area, it would be sun screen, mosquito spray, tweezers to remove bugs from the painting, etc.  Summer
  • @jennie_art ; leave the baby oil at home and never let your art materials know you have it in the house. They will Mutiny. If you don't use slow-dry medium as used by Mark Carder you will need the basic linseed oil and odorless mineral spirits for painting then brush dip to keep your brushes. That's if you use oils. You can bring tupenoid if you want to clean your brushes and clove oil if you want to prolong drying time. But if you can tote everything Denis named you'll be prepared for anything except the bears.
  • SummerSummer -
    edited July 18
    Agree with @BOB73 about the baby oil.  It has mineral oil in it which never dries meaning that your paintings wouldn't either.
  • Okay, I've read everything I can get my eyes on and ordered several bottles of mediums. I am working toward going all Carder method but will take some time to get everything used up I have now, etc. Will you experienced painters please share with me what you use for the following:
    1. Brush dip (for after you've wiped brushes and they are mostly clean)
    2. Medium to thin paints out of tubes and slow drying time
    3. Medium to thin and speed drying time 
    4. What you use to clean up your space, counter top, pochade box, easel?

    Excuse me if my questions reflect my inexperience. I've done about 6 small paintings. 

  • dencaldencal -
    edited July 20
    jennnie_art


    1. Brush dip (for after you've wiped brushes and they are mostly clean)

    I use wanut oil and 1% clove oil. If you were to just wipe the brush the residual paint in the bristle/fiber would harden and render the brush useless. Brush dip keeps the brush in useable condition.

    2. Medium to thin paints out of tubes and slow drying time

    I use Mark's slow dry medium mixed according to his recipe.

    Mark's Recipe

    There are currently no mediums on the market that slow the drying rate of oil paint adequately, so you will need to make it yourself.

    recipe for slow-dry medium (for all colors except titanium white):

    • 10 parts odorless mineral spirits (any artist-grade odorless mineral spirits will do)
    • 5 parts stand oil or linseed stand oil (this is viscous like honey and is not the same as refined linseed oil)
    • 1 part refined linseed oil
    • 5 parts Venice turpentine *
    • 2 parts oil of cloves †

    For burnt umber, you will need extra clove oil. Please watch this video for instructions on how to incorporate the extra clove oil into burnt umber: youtu.be/lpU9egKu-kM

    recipe for slow-dry medium for titanium white:

    • 10 parts odorless mineral spirits
    • 1 part stand oil or linseed stand oil
    • 5 parts refined linseed oil
    • 5 parts Venice turpentine *

    3. Medium to thin and speed drying time 

    I use Liquin to ensure that my paint will be dry in 24 hrs. I also use Liquin for the glazing technique.

    4. What you use to clean up your space, counter top, pochade box, easel?

    Wet wipes do most of this work, but for major oops paper towel and alcohol, or any surface cleaner with hydrogen peroxide. Really dried up paint is best removed with any of the non solvent, non toxic Grafitti removal products, also useful to soak brushes that have dried with paint.

    Denis
    Weatherford
  • edited July 20
    Thank you @dencal for organizing that into one post for me! I really appreciate it and I'm starting to feel confident about this topic.
    Thanks so much!
    Follow up question.... So if I've used mineral spirits to clean counter space in the past am I poisoning my children? I know its very toxic so do I need to go around the kitchen and things down with alcohol or something else. I have moved everything into a dedicated studio room now but was previously using kitchen counter space. Feeling like the worst mom :'(
    Jennie
  • edited July 20
    Thank you @dencal for organizing that into one post for me! I really appreciate it and I'm starting to feel confident about this topic.
    Thanks so much!
    Follow up question.... So if I've used mineral spirits to clean counter space in the past am I poisoning my children? I know its very toxic so do I need to go around the kitchen and things down with alcohol or something else. I have moved everything into a dedicated studio room now but was previously using kitchen counter space. Feeling like the worst mom :'(
    Jennie
    Don't worry, the kids will survive, the best mums are the ones who paint. Very good now that you have a separate room as, depending on how old your kids are, they can be buggers for getting into stuff they shouldn't.
    KaustavBOB73
  • jennie_art

    Agree with Boudicca. Not an issue with infrequent use in well ventilated spaces.
    However, artist's studios tend to be small enclosed spaces with little air flow, solvents in some form are a constant companion. My aim is to reduce, substitute and eliminate solvent use where possible.
    A famous TV personality artist Bob Ross practically bathed in solvents. His system shut down in his fifties with cancerous lymph glands.

    A couple of points I neglected to mention -
    Marks Geneva paint does not contain or need solvents.
    My use of Liquin is occasional not standard practice.

    Denis

    Weatherfordjennie_art
  • edited July 20
    I don't know if this is of any help to you. My plein air medium use is limited to turp + small amount of oil stored in a medicinal squeeze bottle. I use this only for the underdrawing but it wets the surface due to presence of oil. After that the whole painting is done with paint only but I can use small drops of my medium if I need it. Painting is less messy this way.

    For cleaning in outdoor painting it is better to have these things. I wipe my brushes on a cloth or a paper towel, but somehow I felt that this container was missing in my set up.
    httpss-media-cache-ak0pinimgcomoriginalse2ae7fe2ae7fd6a625483338e504506221d192jpg
    BOB73
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