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COMPLETED - Cinque Terre

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Comments

  • SummerSummer -
    edited September 2017
    @PaulB ; I've decided to put clear silicone rubber caulking compound on some my own brushes.  I will post the results in this thread when completed--a day or so.  I'm working on it now.  My other choice that I am going to experiment with is black electricians friction tape.  I'm sure more ideas will pop into my mind with time, and I'll post them here.  I think that we are looking for something that is permanent and feels good.  Summer
  • @Summer: I've tried masking tape and also just winding a rubber band around the handle.  Both work, but I found tape better.
    Summer
  • I think you are going to love the friction tape.  Several types of electricians tapes are made but it is only the friction type I have in mind.  I'm going to try it out in the next several days. 
    PaulB
  • Foam sheets could work (the kind you use for crafts), they have a nice feel.
    Summer
  • The foam tape is worth a try too.
    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited September 2017
    @PaulB ; Well, I've done the experiments and electrician's 3/4-inch black cloth friction tape wins over tubing, foam sleeves, rubber bands, masking tape, foam tape, and clear silicone caulking gel.  It's cheap to purchase, easy to apply and manipulate, easily customized to any shape paintbrush, non-bulky, can use immediately, won't show soil, will last a long time, but can be replaced easily, and the friction of the tape creates a bond between the fingers and the paintbrush that keeps it from falling out of my hand onto the floor as it did before.  Hope you find these things to be true as well.  Interesting experiment.  Summer    
    Renoir
  • Summer said:
    ... 3/4-inch black cloth friction tape ...
    Ordered.  Many thanks.
    Summer
  • Day 25 (99 hours in)

    Three more buildings rendered, and some trees.





    SummerRenoirjrbgolfs
  • Good work Paul. @Summer you didn't try the marshmallow brush holder?
    Summer
  • It's hard to tell without seeing that part of the original source image, but it looks a bit like those roofs are outlined in a value too dark at the moment.
  • I can see the depth building up looking great 
    Renoir
  • Personally, I think you've undertaken your own Sistine Chapel ceiling here... :-) I agree wtih alsart, the depth is beginning to emerge.
  • Day 26 (111 hours in)

    The skyline above the buildings is now complete.  I touched up some of the ocean color because of drawing mistakes that made some buildings too large, some too small, and some with hideous perspective problems.  There are still a lot of perspective problems, and I can't fix them all, so I'm just working on the worst.  I also enjoyed painting a palm tree so much I made it about 50% larger than it should have been, and that's now fixed.

    @Richard_P You are absolutely right about roof lines being too dark. I have fixed the worst of these, but have more to go.  There is a lot of increased contrast because I take phone pictures at night, which does not reproduce color well, even under a 5000K lamp.

    One of the problems is that I zoom in on the photo to see the detail, then paint it according to the enlarged print.  I have a feeling I'm painting JPEG artifacts.



    I also found an Italian flag and painted that.  Here's what I mean by JPEG artifacts - the white pixels around the flag in the photograph.


  • SummerSummer -
    edited September 2017
    @PaulB ; Egads, those JPEGs really lose a lot of data.  Is there a way you can get your hands on a lossless TIFF image of the photograph?  I took a look at Google Images and there is nothing there.  Mostly long shots.  You are painting the best shot I have ever seen of Cinque Terre.  For all the problems that you are having, you are overcoming them very well.  Your colors are looking very good as well--especially now that I've compared them to what's on Google Images.  Summer
    PaulBRenoir
  • There are various filters that you can run to remove JPEG artifacts to some extent. But you've already painted some of the painting so it might make you want to touch up old areas.. :/
    PaulB
  • Just continue being inventive as you already have been so far.
    PaulB
  • Your painting will ultimately be better than the photo.  I love the progress.  Its great fun watching it come together, and you are doing it so well.
    PaulBSummer
  • Summer said:
    Well, I've done the experiments and electrician's 3/4-inch black cloth friction tape wins over tubing, foam sleeves, rubber bands, masking tape, foam tape, and clear silicone caulking gel.     
    Thanks @Summer, this works well.  Sure, it smells like antiseptic dressing in the gangrene ward, but it works.  Fortunately the smell of cloves in the studio overpowers everything anyway.  Many thanks for the tip.




    SummerRenoirJulianna
  • Your welcome.  I'll be using the tape as well, and it was fun!   Something wrong with me because I have always thought of turpentine, clove oil, Clorex Wipes, Bactine, etc. as fragrances and not odors--haha. 
    PaulB
  • Day 29 (120 hours in)

    It's been a few days, because I'm trying to post a slightly more substantial update than before.  Four more buildings are in, and now I'm starting to see the decay and shabbiness of some of these buildings showing through.  There are lots of stained exteriors and peeling paint to represent, and you can see it in this shot.  I find I'm also painting a lot of laundry.



    More dirty exteriors and shading for the minor shadows between buildings.



    Working on the brickwork for the guinea pig, and now bushes.  I had to correct the slope of the brickwork, which was badly off.  More and more corrections are being made for general perspective and placement.



    Today I smeared my elbow across the whole palette.
    RenoirSummerJulianna
  • Congratulations.  You are now officially one of us!  :)


    RenoirPaulB
  • I wouldn't wear one of these either.  But then the artists I remember who did wear them looked good as I recall.  The idea is that they never need laundering.  Sometimes the smocks looked better than the paintings.  I'm not so worried about your clothing as I am the loss of your expensive paints and probably the time you spent preparing the steps.  Bummer!     
    PaulB
  • @PaulB   I am really enjoying your progress photos so we can follow along.  I know it is time-consuming to try to photograph work, upload, post etc....   so thank you for taking the time to do it and share your process and lessons.

    I feel you with the elbow smear, Two days ago, I had a small painting I was working on start to tip forward and as I went to grab it, my wooden palette in my hand fell on me first (I was standing and wearing an apron thank goodness) and then the painting succeeded in falling flat on it's face on my drop cloth.  Fun times.
    Looking forward to your next update!

    PaulBRenoir
  • Summer said:
    I'm not so worried about your clothing as I am the loss of your expensive paints and probably the time you spent preparing the steps.  Bummer!     
    Ah, it's not that bad.  It was a bare elbow, and I don't mix steps, just one color at a time, and there's barely enough paint on there to fill a palette knife.

    I can imagine that smock getting stiffer with paint over time.  Especially around the elbow.
    Summer
  • Julianna said:
    @PaulB   I am really enjoying your progress photos so we can follow along.  I know it is time-consuming to try to photograph work, upload, post etc....   so thank you for taking the time to do it and share your process and lessons.
    Time to confess: it's not very time consuming - I make the photographs in a rush, using a phone, in poor light at the end of the session.  It's relaxing to take a step back and see what changed (not much usually).

    But I should talk more about the process.  It has become clear to me now that there is definitely an optimal order in which I should have done this, namely right to left (I'm left-handed), top to bottom.  It's very difficult to paint to the right of a wet patch, because my forearm is flat against the panel most of the time, for steadiness.
    I feel you with the elbow smear, Two days ago, I had a small painting I was working on start to tip forward and as I went to grab it, my wooden palette in my hand fell on me first (I was standing and wearing an apron thank goodness) and then the painting succeeded in falling flat on it's face on my drop cloth.  Fun times.
    Drop cloth?  How prepared you are!  I hope the spontaneous blending worked out okay.

    While I haven't done that yet, I have dropped everything else.  The best approach for me is not to try and grab it, but watch to see what gets smeared on the way down.


    SummerRenoir
  • PaulB


    i may have a fix for your coloured elbows.

    Inspired by Michael James Smith's natty bridge I made one with furniture glides screwed on the ends.
    This works well for horizontal painting.



    A sliding bridge shown upside down here to illustrate simple assembly. 1.5 x 1.5 x 25 inches.

    Now building a 30x40 inch vertical, palette box, easel to sit on the desktop. The interesting feature here is a sliding track bridge on rollers with a large vertical glass palette. Still a work in progress, parts mostly complete but needs assembly, I'll post a plc soon.

    Denis

    SummerPaulBJulianna
  • Great info here on processes, techniques and overcoming obstacles. A course in itself. Thanks all, especially @PaulB. The pig and greenery are looking real good.
    Summer
  • PaulBPaulB -
    edited September 2017
    @dencal That's a nice device you have there.  I assume it works well on an easel with a top bar for it to roll along, and not on a dibond panel balanced on an Artristic.  That's actually the main impetus for me getting a new easel, so I can have more stability, the ability to raise/lower more easily, and install some kind of thing just like this.

    Michael Smith uses a wooden bar with (I believe I saw it in a couple of his videos) a right angle at the end, and a couple of screws with the tips exposed.  The screws then stick into the easel crossbar, so that one end of the stick is somewhat anchored.  Can't do that with my setup.

    Look forward to your desktop construction photos.

    For me, I can't see how a vertical palette works.  Oil seeps out of my paint and runs across the palette making a mess and it's horizontal.  Also, I don't think I could squeeze Geneva paint onto a vertical palette without it just immediately plopping on the floor.   I get the impression that vertical is only useable if the paint is thick, no medium is involved, and the paint is squeezed onto it in the horizontal position.  I also see a problem picking up paint with a brush dislodging a blob of paint which then falls.  How are you able to make this work for you?
  • PaulB

    This 'simple' bridge was designed for horizontal desktop work. This then inspired the much more elaborate vertical roller bridge with palette.

    However, that being said, the simple version would track quite well on Dibond vertically with a temporary hot glued (or clamped) aluminium gutter.

    As for the paint consistency, I'll just have to cross that bridge when I get to it =)

    Denis
    PaulB
  • BOB73 said:
    Great info here on processes, techniques and overcoming obstacles. A course in itself. Thanks all, especially @PaulB. The pig and greenery are looking real good.
    Thanks @BOB73.  The greenery is hard for me, because it's not squarish and easy like a building.  It also takes longer for me to paint that bush than it does a building.  Let's see if I can speed that up with practice.

    The next greenery update should obscure and remove the pig from the scene, getting back down to zero unintended critters.
    Julianna
  • We'll keep looking as long as you keep counting painting.
    PaulBJulianna
  • edited September 2017
    @dencal   !!!!!  You are amazing!   What a wonderful contraption you designed.  @PaulB   the first thing I did in my studio (a spare bedroom) was place a large, industrial, heavy duty drop cloth in the entire room - it's a good thing too because it is a mess!!!   I figure there are no accidents and my painting wanted to be ruined and scraped off - I had to start over after the scraping - actually though, the scraping left a beautiful image to build on so there is that.

     Have fun!!!!
    PaulB
  • BOB73 said:
    We'll keep looking as long as you keep counting painting.
    I count because I have 1536 square inches to fill, and I can only fill 2-5 square inches a day for the detail work.  I think I have 25% of the panel covered, but that's just a guess.  If I count objects, I see progress.  I need to see progress, because from day to day, I don't notice the change, and that can be demotivating.
    JuliannaRenoir
  • Julianna said:
    @PaulB   the first thing I did in my studio (a spare bedroom) was place a large, industrial, heavy duty drop cloth in the entire room - it's a good thing too because it is a mess!!!
    My approach is simpler - I am my own dropcloth.  I have pretty elbows and shirts.  You have a pretty floor.
     I figure there are no accidents and my painting wanted to be ruined and scraped off - I had to start over after the scraping - actually though, the scraping left a beautiful image to build on so there is that.

     Have fun!!!!
    That's a nice soft painting.  Perhaps floor blending is a new technique...
    JuliannaRenoir
  • Some painters discipline themselves to count every stroke--to maintain the abstraction.  Still, counting every object takes a kind of discipline as well.  Just saying.
  • dencal said:
    PaulB

    Hey! That means Cinque Terre will be completed on 5 June 2019.

    Denis

    Add a few days to put in the hats and critters.  With varnishing it will be 2020.  It's a good thing a customer isn't waiting for this.
    SummerRenoirJulianna
  • It's coming along, @PaulB. Plug away at it bit by bit and you'll get there. The parts you've done are already looking good. 
    PaulBJulianna
  • A friend of mine, closer in age to my father than me, was a fireman and wanted to restore a vintage  fire engine. He had it at the fire station working on it every day for years. He retired and had to move the beast on a trailer to his new home over a hundred miles away. Seven years later, having worked on the truck almost fifteen years total he entered it in a show (fireman's muster) and won first place. When he finished the exterior paint he had to do the gold leaf lettering and needed a name of a fire department to put on the side. His wife supplied the name for it. Perseverance Hose & Ladder Co.
    SummerPaulB
  • BOB73 said:
    ... His wife supplied the name for it. Perseverance Hose & Ladder Co.
    @BOB73, I think that means I should rename this to "Novantadue Ombrelloni", or "1530 sq in of anxiety", or "Why the garden looks abandoned".
    SummerRenoirJuliannaBOB73
  • edited October 2017
    The shrubbery looks great, @PaulB. I'm always amazed at how much one has to tone down greens to get them to look natural - they are always grayer than they seem when you first look at them. The greens on your palette look just like the batch of greens I mixed for my current painting.

    When you get around to it can you give us another wide shot of the whole canvas so we can get a feel for how far you've got and see the detail shots in context?

    Thanks :)

    Rob
    PaulBJulianna
  • This little piggy went to the parapet,


    kaustavM
  • Coming out amazingly! Waiting for the final photograph.
  • @tassieguy Thanks, here is a wide shot.  It's not a good shot because I'm in a room lit for painting, which is to say I have angle lamps pointed right at the panel.  If I step back and try to photograph the whole thing, I get reflections because the panel is large.  If the panel were smaller, I could arrange a light/camera setup that would work.  For a good photo, it will have to wait until I take it outside in sunlight with a camera I do not yet own.



    @Boudicca You're right, that bench does look pig-like.  Not sure I can do much about it.  Here's why:



    @kaustavM Thanks. You might be waiting a while...



    Juliannajrbgolfs
  • @PaulB   the shrubbery looks fantastic!
    PaulB
  • Day 34 (142 hours)

    Some days are better than others.  I added this little cafeteria dungeon extension thing.  I still have some noise to add in there to the tables, and I think I need to lighten those roof supports, and make them look less like tree branches.  



    Moving on to the restaurant above, all was going well.  The roof now looks better, and thereare cables and things added up there.  Some seating and tables are in, more to go.  The stonework below is okay, but probably needs some touching up.

    Then I tried that rock face on the far right.  Oh dear.  I don't really know what went wrong there.  I'm going to paint around it for now, and return to it later.  What is there now is attempt #3, having wiped off the previous two.  There's something about that rock texture I can't get right, not sure what it is yet.



    Next up is another shrubbery.
    SummerBoudiccajrbgolfs
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