Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

You can send an email to forum@drawmixpaint.com if you have questions about how to use this forum.

Help needed with finding a good photo or how to make one of Vermeer's girl with pearl.

Hello fellow painters! I am making a copy-painting of this painting by Vermeer. I bought a poster but the colours were not at all anything like the original. It's not only the brightness bus also the general colours. I don't understand what makes this changes. I frequently visit the original because I live nearby and it is so completely different. 

Below an example of how two pictures of the same painting can be different from each other:

I already spend many hours painting this painting and this is very irritating to me.

Any help is appreciated! 





Comments

  • dencaldencal -
    edited June 4
    Giejan

    Welcome to the Forum.

    Beg, borrow or steal a good camera and take your own photo on a tripod.

    If that is too hard, I am sure the Mauritshuis in The Hague will have multiple sizes posters and postcards to buy, which will be accurately reproduced.

    They may even have digital versions for download or purchase on thumbdrive.


    Denis

  • When I get a yen to paint from a "master," I search the web either by name of the master or the painting in which I'm interested.  Usually, hundreds, if not thousands pop up.  I'll download/save/capture the ones that look the best.  Then, I'll look at them in photoshop, and perhaps tweak one a bit, and start painting.

    The only way you'll ever get the true color is to set up in front of the original painting.  Photos found on the web or taken by you will always be different for a zillion reasons . . . different cameras "see" differently, lighting where you are, the "eye" of the guy taking, or making the copy you purchased, and so on.  The best you can hope for is that your painting will look enough like the original that others will recognize it.
  • Thanks Denis!

    Yes, I will borrow a camera and make my own. The museum have some regulations regarding tripods and stuff so I will see how far I can go.

    The only picture the Mauritshuis use is the big one I posted. I think its a bit too bright I think. In the real one you can see the back of her neck, the right side of her jacket but much more delicate than the picture. I was very surprised about the colour variations in her white collar in the real one. The background of the real one is really black but with a little greenish tint and on the right side it becomes brown. Her turban was as I remember very purple compared to the blue one in the picture. The shadow in her face was very greenish and the cracking in the painting didn't bother me that much and on the pictures they are very annoying. The real one was soo smooth. 

    I also thought that the museum or poster stores have very good quality pictures of museum paintings but I was very disappointed in that. It's like nobody really cares about it that much. 

    I also wonder how bright the lightning in the museum is because it doesn't look so bright to me. I remember most museums I was in the lighting was very intense but in the Mauritshuis everything seems so dark.

    My next step will be taking a picture myself! Great thanks!  
  • Yes Broker12, you are right. Pictures are really just not up for the job. The only way would be for me to sit in front of the real one get my colour checker out and do it that way. :)  I doubt they will let an amateur painter like me in. :( And if I remember the museum rooms are dark, only the paintings itself has lights on them. Maybe I will just borrow the painting for a short while.... 
  • dencaldencal -
    edited June 4
    Giejan

    I was able to download an 855 kb image of Vermeer's painting from Mauritshuis.
    Check it out see if it meets your needs.

    Denis

  • Keep in mind if you are using this as a learning experience (which I assume you are) you should take into account how the artist painted.  That painting was done with glazes.  Unless you plan on doing glazes as well I'm not sure this would be a great choice for a master copy.

  • JeffAllen said:
    Keep in mind if you are using this as a learning experience (which I assume you are) you should take into account how the artist painted.  That painting was done with glazes.  Unless you plan on doing glazes as well I'm not sure this would be a great choice for a master copy.

    That raises an interesting point. Can you use the DMP method to copy paintings that are done using glazes?
  • Richard_P

    i was able to use DMP for a painting and apply adjusting glazes after it was touch dry. For example adding a bit of tonal variation to a panelled background and glazing to blend out cheeks and shoulders.

    Denis

  • Would the museum allow you to bring your paint and palette. If you can't paint there maybe you could at least do your color groups and steps. Don't forget your color checker. Option 2 would be to have a professional photographer  shoot it for you. If he sees the colors in person, he would know better how to expose and process the film or digitize the image.
  • @Richard_P:  I think you can apply the principles that Mark teaches, but ultimately full fledged glazing is different in terms establishing the values in a painting first and then going back in to add color.  Mark teaches wet on wet where you think about value and color at the same time.


  • JeffAllen said:
    @Richard_P:  I think you can apply the principles that Mark teaches, but ultimately full fledged glazing is different in terms establishing the values in a painting first and then going back in to add color.  Mark teaches wet on wet where you think about value and color at the same time.


    Oh, I thought glazing was used to add colour tints onto already coloured areas, rather than using a giselle method?
  • You can use it that way as well.
Sign In or Register to comment.