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Ragged...

Hi All,
     Did this as a drawing exercise...I still have a lot to learn,more specifically things like subtlety,values and details...I had one doubt about details:
     When do we stop detailing the work?I mean a minor wrinkle or some shade of color can give exact characteristics or more likeness to the Painting/drawing as the subject has,so it's really difficult for me to decide when to stop...
     Please post your views and suggestions about it, thanks for having a look :)


KaustavWIKENBOB73Flattytassieguysomedencal

Comments

  • I think you stop when you are pleased with it. That point may change as your skill level changes. It may even mean less detail (Sargent's hands, OMG). The goal for me is not every detail or photo realism, it's my execution of what I see. I decided that I don't need a style, either. Everything I do will be my "style" cuz I did it. I love how you can instantly recognize some artists work, I think that's amazing..
    rautchetanForgivenessBOB73
  • 100% true...its a amazing how can someone specify such a complicated things like hand with fewer efforts!
    Forgiveness
  • Stop, it's terrific, LOL! And for crying out loud you need a nice line-free sketchpad. :3  Thanks for sharing your drawing.
    BOB73
  • edited May 10
    :D :D I am thinking of buying one...as of now doing these as learning exercises only :)
  • This is to add to DawnTup , I often start out with some sort of vision of what I really want in the drawing, starting off slow and easy, I like to step away from my drawing frequently as I go. I observe it from afar, mid range and close up. I don't really commit more to the drawing than what is really necessary as I go along. I rely on my feeling and intuition closely and at some point it just strikes me when I am there.
    rautchetan
  • edited May 10
    Thanks for the info @Forgiveness, Really helpful :) when I step back it looks complete,but when I observe the reference picture again I see more and more details...
  • The lined paper is a distraction and practicing/learning to draw on lined paper can hinder your perception and the perspective but the drawing is terrific.
    rautchetan
  • Definitely get a sketch pad, it's a nice drawing. One of your "practice"sketches could be something you want to mat/frame...
    rautchetanBOB73
  • edited May 10
    Thanks @BOB73 and @DawnTup and Yes I'll surely buy it :) 
  • Do you use any mechanical pencils?  I found that I could get a darker value in my drawings when I use one with 4B lead in it.  As always, value is one of the most important aspects of painting or drawing that can make or break a piece of art.  You have done a really nice job.  You might make his pupils the same size and add some shadow underneath the upper eyelid.  Generally, there is a darker ring around the iris of the eye, but not always.  Apparently your light source is from the front which has caused both sides of the face to have the same pattern of light and shadow.  With your next effort,I would suggest that you have your light source from one side or the other, so that you can have a more interesting play of light and shadow on the face.  Excellent learning piece.
    rautchetan
  • edited May 10
    Hi @oilpainter1950 I did not use mechanical pencil for it, have used only one normal pencil(which I use for plotting key points on canvas usually) for it...and yes next time I will use the subject which has light source from one side,I was intrigued by roughness,beard and wrinkles of this one hence thought of trying it :)
  • That's a good drawing, @rautchetan. I think the amount of detail you have is about right. I think you could get a greater range of values on better quality drawing paper.
    rautchetan
  • edited May 11
    Thanks @tassieguy :) and yes this paper does seem to limit range of values especially dark ones.
  • The underlying structure is more important than the details.  Once you get that down, the amount of detail you incorporate is really a matter of personal taste I think.  The human brain is very good at interpolating detail that isn't even there based off of suggestions.
    rautchetan
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