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For Australian and New Zealand based artists

Just reading about these oil paints . Sound very good, too expensive to buy here for me..

http://langridgecolours.com/langridge-handmade-oil-colour/

dencal

Comments

  •  They are what I use, @Richard. I love them.
  • I mentioned them because I remember @Dencal saying he used W&N Artisans as other brands were too expensive to import (If I remember rightly)
  • Richard_P

    Partly true. I use Artisan as they allow me to use SDM and are less expensive but closely approximate W&Ns Artist Colour range.

    Denis

  • edited May 5
    @Boudicca introduced me to Langridge paints. I'm very glad she did.  They're not really so expensive. No more so that W&N if I remember correctly. I buy then online from the Sydney Art Store. What I like about Langridge is the very heavy pigment load and no fillers or other additives. They mix beautifully pure, strong colours and the black you can mix with BU and Ultramarine is incredibly black and has great covering power as do all the other colours. So a little Langridge goes a long way and the tubes last for ages. And when you mix with medium they still retain excellent covering power. It turns out cheaper in the long run than buying less expensive, poorer quality paints.They are quite simply the best paints I have ever used. Compared to the Daler-Rowney Georgian I started with there is just no comparison.  Until I can get Geneva in OZ I'll never paint with anything else.
  • Yes, I love Langridge oil paint. I think they are reasonably priced for the great quality. Only paint I use now.
  • I see you all already know about them! ;)
  • I'm glad you folks off of western Hawii (LOL) have found a good quality oil paint you can get locally. I read about them. I'm guessing you would use pyrolle for primary red and ultramarine but what yellow? It sounds like these would be ideal for wet-in-wet one layer painting.


  • BOB73 said:

    I'm glad you folks off of western Hawii (LOL) have found a good quality oil paint you can get locally. I read about them. I'm guessing you would use pyrolle for primary red and ultramarine but what yellow? It sounds like these would be ideal for wet-in-wet one layer painting.



    I'm using cadmium yellow, cadmium red, UM blue, and burnt umber. The UMB and BU make a lovely black. For the horse painting I used red oxide as well. I'm sure I could have mixed the colour but I wanted to try it out.
    BOB73
  • Has anyone using the Langridge paints had trouble with the titanium white or ultramarine (both safflower based) reacting with the clove oil in the SDM? I started off using the Art Spectrum titanium (safflower) and it turned to chewing gum when in contact with anything containing clove oil, so I had to shift to the Rembrandt 118 linseed titanium, with no problems since. Funny thing is I have two brands of clove oil and one reacts badly with the safflower paints I have, and the other the reaction is only minor. I'd like to try the Langridge, given the good things folks are saying about it.

    Also, the red I'm currently using is some leftover Quinacridone red (Da Vinci). I see Langridge has the same pigment, so wondering if anyone has tried it out and has an opinion?
  • Roxy

    Welcome to the Forum

    I use W&N Artisan WM titanium white with SDM - no problems.

    Denis

  • edited May 6
    Hi, @Roxy.
    I have no problem with the Langridge TW but, then, I don't use clove oil. The TW is quite thick and sticky straight from the tube so I just thin it down with my medium which is just linseed oil and a tiny bit of OMS. It works beautifully. It dries in a few days so there is time to blend if you want but I rarely blend so even if it dried faster it wouldn't matter. The Langridge Quinacridone is gorgeous. So powerful you only need tiny amounts but that's true of all the Langridge colours. I won't paint with anything else -not until I can try the Geneva when it finally gets to OZ.


    BTW, @BOB73, for a cool yellow I use the Langridge arylide and for a warm yellow the cadmium. Both are incredibly strong so you need very little and they give wonderfully pure, strong  hues when mixed with other colours - for example to make green with blue or orange with red.
    BOB73
  • I'm in the US and don't have the Langridge but they sound like they should be the artist's standard. I'm just boggled by the variety of characteristics of oil paints and the huge differences in performance between brands and even colors within brands. Then the manufacturers complicate it further by having different grades within brands. I'm really learning a bunch from this forum. Thanks all. BTW the prices didn't seem too high if they are so strong in pigment and opacity. A little bit can go a long way with a little more medium.
  • Thanks @tassieguy they do sound wonderful. I travel to Melbourne a bit for work so I'll pick up a couple of tubes next time I'm there - I saw them in one of the CBD art supply stores last time I was there and nearly bought them on the spot. Should have just done it. 

    And thanks @dencal for the tip about the Artisan titanium - its good to know there are a few options available. Thanks also for the welcome. I've only just signed up but have been lurking for a while. I'm so impressed by the generosity of this forum and the quality of the advice (and by the quality of the artworks on display!). I agree with @BOB73, I have learnt so much from this forum already (not to mention the humbling generosity of Mark Carder, without whom I would have never gotten back into painting - but that is a story for another day). I'm currently part way through my first DMP effort, and intend to post a WIP and seek some feedback when I get the canvas a bit more covered. 
    dencalBoudiccaBOB73
  • edited May 6


    Roxy said:


    Has anyone using the Langridge paints had trouble with the titanium white or ultramarine (both safflower based) reacting with the clove oil in the SDM? I started off using the Art Spectrum titanium (safflower) and it turned to chewing gum when in contact with anything containing clove oil, so I had to shift to the Rembrandt 118 linseed titanium, with no problems since. Funny thing is I have two brands of clove oil and one reacts badly with the safflower paints I have, and the other the reaction is only minor. I'd like to try the Langridge, given the good things folks are saying about it.

    Also, the red I'm currently using is some leftover Quinacridone red (Da Vinci). I see Langridge has the same pigment, so wondering if anyone has tried it out and has an opinion?




    Hi @Roxy I haven't had any issues with the TW or UMB from Langridge mixing with SDM. I previously was using Art Spectrum and didn't have those issues. My understanding is the SDM recipe for TW is a bit different from the SDM for red,yellow, blue in that it doesn't contain clove oil and there needs to be extra clove oil When mixing for burnt umber. The clove oil I use is Gold Cross made in Australia- its pharmacy grade. Hope this helps.

    recipe for slow-dry medium for titanium white:

    • 10 parts odorless mineral spirits
    • 1 part stand oil or linseed stand oil
    • 5 parts refined linseed oil
    • 5 parts Venice turpentine *
    From the Draw,Mix,Paint supply list.
  • Hi @Boudicca, Thanks. My Art Spectrum titanium when mixed with the titanium recipe (in the jar) was just fine, However my steps hardened overnight when I mixed my white with the other pigments (that were mixed with the standard SDM). I'm pretty sure is was the quite potent clove oil I used in my medium (viscous, yellow-ish, overpowering aroma). I now have another brand (thinner, clearer, not quite as strong) that seems to behave much better. I guess the message is that not all oils are equal.  
    Boudicca
  • Roxy you got some old clove oil. It needs to be fresh and clear but now you know from experience.
  • Ahhh that makes sense, thanks @BOB73
    BOB73
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