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just i think

this painting depicts Picasso's second and final wife, Jacqueline Roque. The Woman in the Lamp is one of the most important works of Picasso's artistic career, "A Woman of Reading", a masterpiece of Picasso's later years. In the painter's long, prolific and successful painting career, Picasso's long-term preference for the subject matter, but also witnessed a new change in the artist.

ArtistMartin1Kaustav

Comments

  • You know sunsun,  I'm going to open myself up to all kinds of ridicule here because frankly "I don't get it".  I know art is subject to all kinds of admirers; but I never got this type of art.  I wish someone could explain to me why paintings like this are considered masterpieces.  I certainly don't mean to offend anyone but I truly don't understand this style of painting at all.  It's okay if you want to correct me.
  • edited January 19
    Have you ever looked back and Picasso's beginning.  Word was, "He could draw like an angel."  And it is true.  Search back to his early days.  His drawings will take away your breath.  What happened was, he wearied of the time he was spending on his drawing.  It occurred to him that perhaps he could do his drawing in shorter time if he simplified.  He got on this kick, and never got away from it.  Surely you've seen some of his linear paintings where the face shows both profile and full face, usually with one wonky eye.  His thought, here, was to try to do what no one else had ever done . . . show the human form both in profile and full face simultaneously.

    Somewhere there are a series of drawings he did on an ordinary bull.  Each succeeding drawing becomes more and more simplified until he's showing you the animal with a very few lines, which was his intent.

    There is a story about him when he hung out with Gertrude Stein, Hemingway and others in Paris long, long ago.  Gertrude knew all of these guys were poor and struggling and so she invited them up to her apartment for Christmas dinner.  Appropriately, each brought a small gift.  Picasso brought her a small drawing that he called a portrait of her.  "But Pablo," she whined, "this doesn't look like me," to which Pablo replied, "It will."

    It will help your understanding if you know what he was up to.  His work leaves me cold, too, but it kind of helps to know what his goals were.  At least, I look at this work and find myself asking what he was trying to with this one.
  • I think during this time period when photography was replacing illustrations in newspapers and magazines painting needed to do what photography couldnt... mainly abstract art with some hidden meaning...also the return to caveman like art...simplfy with meaning behind each piece. I think today there is a return to more classical style of painting, trying to undo what has been lost...the true technical ability of Sargent''s realism.
  • You know sunsun,  I'm going to open myself up to all kinds of ridicule here because frankly "I don't get it".  I know art is subject to all kinds of admirers; but I never got this type of art.  I wish someone could explain to me why paintings like this are considered masterpieces.  I certainly don't mean to offend anyone but I truly don't understand this style of painting at all.  It's okay if you want to correct me.

    However, art, which needs creative thinking from artists, focuses on the abstract expression of the existing world. Almost all the striking artworks originated from creative ideas of artists. Expressionism is art that shows emotions and ideas through non-representational-forms non-representational forms.Among these artists, there was a group marked by a tendency to exploit the expressive possibilities of colors and lines, To put it simply,this style of painting is a way for what is in their heart






  • broker12 said:
    Have you ever looked back and Picasso's beginning.  Word was, "He could draw like an angel."  And it is true.  Search back to his early days.  His drawings will take away your breath.  What happened was, he wearied of the time he was spending on his drawing.  It occurred to him that perhaps he could do his drawing in shorter time if he simplified.  He got on this kick, and never got away from it.  Surely you've seen some of his linear paintings where the face shows both profile and full face, usually with one wonky eye.  His thought, here, was to try to do what no one else had ever done . . . show the human form both in profile and full face simultaneously.

    Somewhere there are a series of drawings he did on an ordinary bull.  Each succeeding drawing becomes more and more simplified until he's showing you the animal with a very few lines, which was his intent.

    There is a story about him when he hung out with Gertrude Stein, Hemingway and others in Paris long, long ago.  Gertrude knew all of these guys were poor and struggling and so she invited them up to her apartment for Christmas dinner.  Appropriately, each brought a small gift.  Picasso brought her a small drawing that he called a portrait of her.  "But Pablo," she whined, "this doesn't look like me," to which Pablo replied, "It will."

    It will help your understanding if you know what he was up to.  His work leaves me cold, too, but it kind of helps to know what his goals were.  At least, I look at this work and find myself asking what he was trying to with this one.

    thanks i think so
  • I think during this time period when photography was replacing illustrations in newspapers and magazines painting needed to do what photography couldnt... mainly abstract art with some hidden meaning...also the return to caveman like art...simplfy with meaning behind each piece. I think today there is a return to more classical style of painting, trying to undo what has been lost...the true technical ability of Sargent''s realism.
    In general, It's really a classic painring,


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