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My first color chart

Made my first ever color chart. I was surprised by the colors I was able to get. I used heavy body acrylics, it was fun and I plan to do some more.

Comments

  • You sort of miss the point. 
  • I'm not sure how I'm missing the point? I want to be able to match a color with the paints I have. I'm still working with acrylics, I don't want to waste them and can't get the oils right now, so I took 6 of my best ones in the largest tubes (red, yellow, blue, green, pink and purple) since red, yellow and blue are primary colors thought that would work fine and just added the other 3 for fun working left to right top to bottom made a color mixing chart so that I can match a color and its values. With those six colors I am able to get these: 
  • P.s. I'm really not trying to be cheeky, trying to learn. I have a hard time with values and colors so after watching a few Thomas Baker videos on making color charts I thought at the least it would help me learn how to mix colors better.... I am defiantly open to better suggestions and solutions.
  • @jswartzart The color chart I posted is made using Geneva colors. All those spectral color made from Geneva red , blue and yellow. They are interrelated tonally, these are simply the colors to use for mixing to neutrals. The ONE concept of DMP is that almost all colors can be made from Mark's choice of primaries. The color chips you are making are well just color chips. 
    Watch Mark's videos and pay attention to his base palette. Getting to the nuetral of real world painting can be achieved in many ways. The thing that is a constant are the core primaries. Learning this will save you years of confusion. 
    Kaustav
  • Of the colours you have, if you also have a burnt umber and a titanium white then you have pretty much the 5 colours that Mark recommends. You might need to use the magenta rather than the red, not sure, as the red Mark uses is darker in value and is a bit more bluish than a pure red.

    I've used these colours with acrylics and mark's method and it definitely works.

    Does that help?

    jswartzart
  • edited August 2016
    @Richard_P great that you mentioned about acrylics. Do the colors become a little whitish after diluting them to a runny consistency, especially the dark colors like blues? If that happens how do you handle that to match the values and colors?
  • edited August 2016
    titanium white was the color I used to mix and lighten the value... Currently the only burnt umber I have is Apple barrel craft paint and since it's just junk I don't wanna use it.
    I understand the DMP method, however I watched this video series on YouTube 

    The man is also a very talented painter (anyone who can paint old masters the way he does I don't want to dismiss what they have to say as of no value just because it isn't dmp method)
    I just thought making the these color charts with the paints I have would be a good exercise for me. And I did learn from it, I'm sure this is simple stuff for others but I didn't know mixing yellow and purple makes brown for example lol. 
  • Don't waste your time. Paint. Get good paint. Geneva or w&n and paint. Learn the simple color wheel. 
  • Kaustav said:
    @Richard_P great that you mentioned about acrylics. Do the colors become a little whitish after diluting them to a runny consistency, especially the dark colors like blues? If that happens how do you handle that to match the values and colors?
    Yes, this is a problem with diluting pigments with water (acrylics, watercolours and watermixable oils). The resulting colour tends to lighten and then darkens again once dry. There isn't an easy way to deal with this when colour matching. You could match all the colours when wet with the understanding they all will darken, but the amount is probably different each time). Or you could mix on a stay wet palette, then apply to a laminated photo, or a colour checker and only use that mixture when dry. The disadvantage with this is that it means every colour check taken minutes to perform..

    I understand that oils don't have this problem due to the paint containing oil rather than water which doesn't cause the same issue.
    jswartzart
  • titanium white was the color I used to mix and lighten the value... Currently the only burnt umber I have is Apple barrel craft paint and since it's just junk I don't wanna use it.
    I understand the DMP method, however I watched this video series on YouTube 

    The man is also a very talented painter (anyone who can paint old masters the way he does I don't want to dismiss what they have to say as of no value just because it isn't dmp method)
    I just thought making the these color charts with the paints I have would be a good exercise for me. And I did learn from it, I'm sure this is simple stuff for others but I didn't know mixing yellow and purple makes brown for example lol. 
    There are different ways to colour mix. It's fun to experiment, but it can be easy to get caught up in experimenting and never sticking to one approach or finishing things. If it works for you then go for it! :)
    jswartzart
  • Kingston said:
    Don't waste your time. Paint. Get good paint. Geneva or w&n and paint. Learn the simple color wheel. 
    You just said don't waste your time making colour charts, but you've posted one you've just done yourself??
  • @richard_p I do have a difficult  time focusing, finishing and sticking to one thing....I :) see your point....I will have to be more diciplined. 
  • @jswartzart Maybe simpler, quicker paintings? That's what I'm doing at the moment, and it's a lot of fun :)
    jswartzart
  • I did this for a class I'm teaching in September for beginning painters. It shows the realationship of tone and a mixed spectrum from primaries in a specified pattern. Oddly enough it proves Marks claims very simply. This simple chart when match with the clot wheel is a great place to start. I will be offering them grids and patterns to exercise color mixing. Color mixing not value ramps. 

    Based on on color studies of Denman Ross. A bit antiquated writing style  but grounded Cole relationship stuff  I wouldnt expect most people to dive too deep 
  • edited August 2016
    Remember the color wheel that is most often expressed I'd spectral color. Light. Not pigment. So when applying wheel principles to pigment a little charting is a good idea. Always keep to the primaries and power/support colors. Add new tube colors as you broaden your color experience 
    jswartzart
  • edited August 2016
    @kingston okay I think I understand your chart now
    its the primary colors red, yellow, blue and secondary orange, green, purple as you would see on the color wheel layed down chart form using the limited pallet to achieve color needed. So am I correct in understanding that tone moves horizontal across the chart (how blue, yellow or red a color is) while the value is vertical (the light and darkness of the color)?

    I will buy quality paints in the future and not a variety of colors Anymore. One reason made the charts I did.... I have these big tubes of crazy colors that are not the right tones ( cadmium red l. Hue, anthrquinone blue, hansa yellow med., phthalo green blue shade, dioxazine purple, quinacridone magenta) trying to mix the red and blue should give me purple right but instead instantly gives me a very dark gray... So if I can see what these colors will look like mixed beforehand then I'm not wasting paint or time trying to get it the one I actually need. I gotta work with what I currently have on hand for now. 
  • All colors can be used but best if you know where they fit in the greater mixing scheme.as for starting with the primaries what better way to learn. The next thing is managing neutrals using the concepts of analogous., compliment, split complement  etc. then you'll have the foundation to mix all color or substitute name colors in the palette. Monet said that he was consumed with thinking of color. Me too. 
    jswartzart
  • The additive primaries (in light) are red, green and blue. The subtractive primaries (in inks / pigments) are magenta, yellow and cyan. These 3 are used alongside black in colour printers.

    However there are no pigments available that are a perfect match for the ideal subtractive primaries.

    If you are interested in all of this then the website handprint.com has very detailed discussions on colour vision, colour mixing, and pigments. :)

    Have a look at this colour wheel with a lot of the pigments marked. I have drawn a line from PR254 - Pyrrole Red (often used as a Cadmium Hue) to PB60 - Indanthrone Blue (Also called Anthrquinone blue). Colour mixing isn't as precise as this straight line, but it's close enough.. Now, see how close it comes to the centre which is a desaturated colour (blacks-greys-white)?

    Hope that helps!


    jswartzartThiago.nunesousaA_Abaev
  • edited August 2016
    @richard_p that is awesome! Thank you yes it helps! I can see why it gave me grey and not purple.
  • instead of simplifying you are adding more chaos. This may be the result of a longer process of color understanding. Again this is not paint it's the spectral dye or pigment specs. Without  the actual density and effect of application. There is no way the learn how it works except starting from the beginning primaries with are parents of all other colors. Change one primary from day Alizarian to vermillion and you have a whole new spectrum unique. 
    jswartzart
  • I find it important to understand the colors you like to work with. If your engaging in Mark carder method, pick up the colors he uses and work with those, the branch out and discover what you like.

    I know a painter that uses vivid colors, many of which are transparent. It's how she paints. I like to use totally different colors. Cerulean blue and   yellow ochre are choices I make. Pthalo turquoise and Hansa yellow might be the choice of others. Everyone paints differently. What you put on your palette goes into making your art distinctly yours as much as your technique and subject matter choices.

    It is just easier for me to own tubes of color I use so I don't have to mix. I actually disagree with mixing a pure color that exists. Other than cost, why use 3 colors to achieve pthalo blue. Just buy it. Then when you mix it with something, it's mixing 2 colors instead of 4, each with a bias.
    jswartzart
  • edited August 2016
    This thread is becoming complicated haha, Mark Carder is probably rolling his eyes at all of us lol. B) ( or at least me... I can almost hear it..draw, mix, paint...simple)
    Kingston
  • So to summarise: Try things and see what works for you :)
    jswartzart
  • I love working with Geneva paints. But I must admit I miss the vibrancy of other colours. 
    Can't wait till Mark brings out the new colours. 
    Having used the Geneva , it's hard to use anything else. 
    Sort of like driving a new Mercedes and then going back to driving an old banger !! 


    jswartzart
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