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Too much clove oil

Oil paint dries so fast during the summer here in Spain that I have been mixing a LOT of clove oil in my paints. I do that so that it stays wet long enough to blend tonal values, once they've all been laid out in a grisaille underpainting. The problem is -- even after a month -- the paint is dry but kind of chalky, so if I try to oil it out with any kind of medium - I'm using Liquin but it would be the same with any other medium - it smudges and moves the dry paint around and ruins the underpainting.

Does anybody have any suggestion as to how to fix the chalky underpainting so that I can glaze over it? One painting I did with less clove oil (still a significant amount, though) seems dry enough to glaze over, but even that would smudge I'm sure.

I sprayed charcoal fixative onto part of the chalky underpainting and it helped, but not enough and the underpainting still spread around and smudged  I thought about spraying a matte varnish. Even an exhibition varnish would smudge around, so not sure what to do.

Comments

  • IndraIndra -
    edited August 2016
    Liquid is a quick dry medium or a medium, depending which version you buy.. It may be reacting with your clove oil causing chalky appearance, but if you can post an example pic it might help. I know of a few people who have had issues of chalky looking when using liquid. It's generally a good stable product, 

    Your under painting is not dry, so you can't glaze over it without ultimately making you painting unstable. Charcoal fixative is not a good idea. You're  using a sealant over wet oil paint.  If you absolutely have to rush, use acrylic for the underpainting and oil over it. For your current painting, you can varnish it when it's dry and glaze over the varnish. If something goes wrong you can wipe it and your underpainting will be there still.
    Jesse
  • Thanks - I may have to spray varnish on it then. The thing is that it is effectively dry -- it's chalky before I add any Liquin. The Liquin isn't making it chalky. When I add Liquin or any other medium, solvent, etc, with a brush - it smudges it. I used so much clove oil that I don't think it will ever stop being chalky. 

  • @Jesse
    If the only problem is its chalky, spray varnish should bring back the color the way oiling out does. Keep in mind clove oil is a solvent. If you are using a lot, that may be why you get smudging. Think of clove oil like turp or mineral spirit. You have a lot of solvent in your mixture if you have a lot of clove oil. 
    Jesse
  • JesseJesse -
    edited August 2016
    Indra said:

    @Jesse
    If the only problem is its chalky, spray varnish should bring back the color the way oiling out does. Keep in mind clove oil is a solvent. If you are using a lot, that may be why you get smudging. Think of clove oil like turp or mineral spirit. You have a lot of solvent in your mixture if you have a lot of clove oil. 
    Thanks - that makes sense. It's really a conundrum: I have to slow down the drying drastically to be able to blend on the second or third day of painting the grisaille, but then the solvent renders the paint too dry.  :s
  • @Jesse

    You can try a number of things as work around.

    For the grisalle,  acrylics that you can reopen to blend like Atelier Interactive. Even if they dry out completely, you just spray them with solution and the reopen. http://www.atelieracrylic.com/atelier-interactive-acrylic  Visit the website and watch some or the YouTube reviews.

     You can also try putting you painting in the fridge in a covered container and rubbing clove oil on the lid of the container.  Or sticking a cotton ball with clove oil on it in there. Clove oil keeps paint open because it keeps the paint from absorbing oxygen, but it doesn't have to be in your paint.

     I know a few artists who use regular oil paint, but store their palettes under a lid or cover with a few drops of clove on the inside. The effect is the same as putting the clove in the paint. the oils stay wet.

    I generally use a walnut oil paint and just add a couple drops of walnut oil as a medium. It dries really slow, but once dry, it's dry. Sounds like your underpainting gets chalky and looks dry but in reality isn't because the clove oil is still not evaporated off. You used a lot so it may be six months to dry completely.

      I am using Geneva Artist oils, which have cloves, when I recently had to wipe off something, even the tone I put on the canvas came off (clove oil = solvent). The brand is sold as being without solvents, but clove is a solvent.

    Jesse
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