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Brush bristles sticking out

Hello!
When I started using the draw mix paint method, I bought myself some new brushes. These have never been cleaned with turps, only kept with brush dip.
Nevertheless, one of my brushes (the culprit is pictured below) has bristles sticking out, rather than being beautiful like Mark's. I'm wondering why. It's an artists first choice brush, natural bristles. It's my smallest brush, the larger ones don't seem to have that problem. Size 1.
I squeeze out the brush dip with a paper towel before I paint, and before I redip.
Thank you in advance!
Anna

Comments

  • I have the same problem so I'm taking more care now to only drag and wipe the paint onto the canvas with the brush (as advised by Mark) instead of pushing and stabbing it on. I think that is what was causing my problems but this may not be so in your case. For some reason the smaller brushes seem more prone to this problem. 
  • dencaldencal -
    edited July 2016
    Anna

    Dip in hair gel and shape bristles with your fingers. Should later dissolve in brush dip.
    If this is meant to be a filbert I would reshape the bristles with a razor. If the brush is a round, then the gel will do the trick.

    Alternately, a coat of brush dip and an elastic band may bring them back into line.

    Denis


    CdnArtist
  • I would save that for plein air painting or toss it. 
    Kaustav
  • I would never cut the bristles on a brush. you will remove the natural tips. I would wash with soap (or detergent or Lustre Sheen) and water, rinse ( can use hair conditioner in rinse) thoroughly and dry  laying flat with a paper cone on the hairs to re train the hairs to form a point (if it's a round brush) or edge (if it's a flat, filbert or bright ) much like a woman will curl her hair, you will retrain the hairs to curve in the right direction. I wash my brushes in detergent and water and give it hair conditioner and use clothes pin on my flats to squeeze the hairs in place and make them behave. They will look like new.  
    PS if you use either Masters Brush Cleaner or Lustre Sheen (available at Deltaart in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) no conditioner is necessary, both are loaded with conditioning agents. Non toxic. If you use harsh detergents hair conditioner will be needed to prevent bristles from getting brittle. If your brushes are synthetic just detergent and is water good enough. Be sure to dry thoroughly.
  • Thank you all for your thoughts, and such varied methods of managing this issue. It is meant to be a filbert brush (flat brush). I'm not sure how it got so out of shape. I was conscious and careful to only drag the brush and not stab it. Perhaps I painted too vigorously without even knowing it! Or squeezed it too harshly between the paper...

    I'll give the suggested methods a go. I had no idea there were so many ways to work with the brush bristles! Hair gel, conditioner - really makes me realise I'm painting with hair!!

    I'll let you guys know how I go!
    Kaustav
  • Could you please tell us if that is an expensive brush? Is the hair density in the brush thinner?
  • Sure, I think this one was about AU$7.00. If by hair density, you mean the number of bristles in it (?), then yes, it is thinner than I usually paint with/my other brushes used for DMP. 
  • If it helps, this is another picture of the brush - I haven't done anything to it yet. It gives a size reference (that's a table spoon), and a different angle on the brush. The bristle issue can't be seen as clearly in this photo...
  • Hmmm. I am not sure if anything can be done to this. Follow what @dencal instructed, if it helps... But I guess the line producing ability with the tip of this filbert is gone.
  • So I have only used golden taklon brushes and don't know if this will work for you or not but if you boil vinegar and dip your brush in it it will return to perfect shape - like I said don't know how it will work on other types of brushes but works perfect for the ones I mentioned
  • Hi @Anna, I'm in Oz too and struggled to find decent brushes at a reasonable price. I eventually went online and bought Rosemary & Co ivories. Good price and excellent quality.
    Lisab
  • So it sounds like it might be something about the quality of the brush, rather than necessarily anything that I've done. That's interesting. The Windsor and newton brushes have held up much better. I wouldn't have thought it makes such a difference. 
    I still haven't tried any of the fixes suggested, yet. I probably will end up getting a new brush.
    I'll check out that online brand too.
    Thank you everyone for your input and suggestions!
  • @Boudicca can I ask which of their brushes you use? And, is this the right web page? (Links to filbert brushes) www.rosemaryandco.com/oil-brushes/classic-filbert 
  • Hi @Anna, that's the right site. The brushes I bought were the ivory range. I went overboard as you can see. They are a synthetic bristle, I use Marks recipe for brush dip for keeping them in good shape. The ones i use the most are the filberts.


    KaustavAnna
  • I go with what Marttin says.
  • @Boudicca wow they look like new!! Thanks for sharing :)
  • @Anna ; Interesting problem and story to go with it.  As was suggested earlier, I'd save it for a special technique after some experimentation  Should we have a contest to see who has in their possession one of the worst brushes they own?  I have one that I'm really embarrassed to say that I have.  :p
    LisabAnnaMartin_J_Crane
  • Boudicca said:
    Hi @Anna, that's the right site. The brushes I bought were the ivory range. I went overboard as you can see. They are a synthetic bristle, I use Marks recipe for brush dip for keeping them in good shape. The ones i use the most are the filberts.


    Maybe a touch overboard.. ;)
    Boudicca
  • somesome -
    edited August 2016
    FYI,I now remember I hurt a few small brushes while wiping the bristles with a towel, I squeezed too hard. Pulling on the bristles too much. Not saying this happened to you, but it's a mistake I have made. But sometimes it's just a bad brush and if it makes u agravated,  get out the scissors. All the frustration will stop right away. Then it becomes a handy stick.  ;)
  • @some lol! Nah I'm not that peeved. I just wanted to nip the issue in the bud before it ruined my other brushes too. I think I was probably too vigorous in my squeezing the brush bristles between the other too. I'll be more gentle in the future :)
  • Hmm, I just checked and it's happening to a Windsor and newton brush too, one I didn't use that much, one that has more bristle density.

    One other variable that I just thought of, is that the only safflower oil I could find to use as brush dip, was the artisan brand one. Which is for use with water mixable oils. I reasoned at the time that it shouldn't make a difference... Perhaps I was wrong? Has anyone else tried this/experienced this?
  • Anna

    Do you use soap,water or solvents on your brushes?

    Denis

  • I really think that its the brushes.  I have used W&N brushes and they just don't hold up that well, and I tried loads of tricks.  I switched to Rosemary Ivories, which aren't much more expensive, and I have had no trouble at all.    
    some
  • @dencal never on these brushes

    @Martin_J_Crane write fair enough. I thought W&N ones were meant to be fantastic. I'll give the rosemary ivories a go. Pity, the W&N were the most extensive oil brushes I've bought.
  • edited October 2016
    Did anyone ever buy Daler Rowney Georgian brushes? I have been using these and they are very good for the price. Even size 1 and 2 are thick with bristles.
  • Hey everyone. Just thought I'd update. I didn't end up trying any of the methods suggested above (I was pretty frustrated with my brushes and just ignored them for ages) but, on the tip of a friend, wrote to w&n about this issue, and they replaced the brushes! Didn't expect that! I have yet to try them. I bought some different ones instead, which I'm really enjoying using :)
  • tassieguy said:
    I have the same problem so I'm taking more care now to only drag and wipe the paint onto the canvas with the brush (as advised by Mark) instead of pushing and stabbing it on. I think that is what was causing my problems but this may not be so in your case. For some reason the smaller brushes seem more prone to this problem. 
    tassieguy said:
    I have the same problem so I'm taking more care now to only drag and wipe the paint onto the canvas with the brush (as advised by Mark) instead of pushing and stabbing it on. I think that is what was causing my problems but this may not be so in your case. For some reason the smaller brushes seem more prone to this problem. 
    tassieguy said:
    I have the same problem so I'm taking more care now to only drag and wipe the paint onto the canvas with the brush (as advised by Mark) instead of pushing and stabbing it on. I think that is what was causing my problems but this may not be so in your case. For some reason the smaller brushes seem more prone to this problem. 
    nice sharing!!
  • painting and makeup brushes are same or not? any one tell these brushes are use for painting or not?

    Best Makeup Brushes Sets


  • kendraallen

    Welcome to the Forum.

    Makeup brushes are too soft for oil paint. Best for brushy texture is hog bristle. Smoother brushstrokes with synthetics.

    Denis
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