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Choosing a camera

So, I've been looking at some cameras and saw that the Olympus OM-D E-M10 was recommended in the photo guide. It seems nice, however I wanted to see if there was any newer models of cameras (2016 models) that would be better if I had a bit more cash to spend? Not only do I want a camera for full-size portraits,  but my interest in general photography has grown and would like something for that as well. Thanks for the help and recommendations. 

Comments

  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] admin
    edited May 2016
    It's up to you to decide whether you want a "micro four thirds" sensor camera (like the Olympus OM-D series) or something else, but if you do want that type of camera, there are a couple step-up alternatives if you have the cash to spend. If you're interested in one you can ask and I'll try to give you a practical explanation of the benefits of a particular upgrade.

    In short, though, I think the E-M10 II (the newer model of the E-M10) is not worth paying extra money for. The E-M5 II is worth it if you want a weather-sealed camera (it has other advantages but this is the biggest one). The E-M5 II defaults to a better menu interface than the others, but they can all be switched to this alternate interface in the settings.

    I probably would not go beyond this price range if you're at the stage in your photography that you have to ask for advice on cameras, if that makes sense. But the E-M1 II is going to be released soon, and if you really don't have to worry about money at all, I think it's going to be a fantastic camera and better than the others listed here. The original E-M1 might be better as well, I haven't looked into it, but I'm a little wary of recommending something that is both expensive and three years old. Camera tech moves quickly.

    [The naming scheme for these cameras is confusing, I know. E-M10 < E-M5 < E-M1, and each have a Mark I and Mark II version]
  • FlattyFlatty admin
    I have the recommended camera from the photo guide . Works really well and is easy to use:-)
  • It's up to you to decide whether you want a "micro four thirds" sensor camera (like the Olympus OM-D series) or something else, but if you do want that type of camera, there are a couple step-up alternatives if you have the cash to spend. If you're interested in one you can ask and I'll try to give you a practical explanation of the benefits of a particular upgrade.

    In short, though, I think the E-M10 II (the newer model of the E-M10) is not worth paying extra money for. The E-M5 II is worth it if you want a weather-sealed camera (it has other advantages but this is the biggest one). The E-M5 II defaults to a better menu interface than the others, but they can all be switched to this alternate interface in the settings.

    I probably would not go beyond this price range if you're at the stage in your photography that you have to ask for advice on cameras, if that makes sense. But the E-M1 II is going to be released soon, and if you really don't have to worry about money at all, I think it's going to be a fantastic camera and better than the others listed here. The original E-M1 might be better as well, I haven't looked into it, but I'm a little wary of recommending something that is both expensive and three years old. Camera tech moves quickly.

    [The naming scheme for these cameras is confusing, I know. E-M10 < E-M5 < E-M1, and each have a Mark I and Mark II version]
    Thanks for the advice. I feel like I'd be able to spend about $1,000 for a camera. I would definitely say that I'm a beginner, but not completely unacquainted =) I asked for an alternative because I do like an "investment" and I know I am gonna practice using it, researching more, and becoming more and more experienced over time and actually be able to use everything the camera can offer. I just don't want to spend 600 dollars on a camera and then 2 months later say, "oh, i should have gone with the $800 one with that extra feature." or whatever, you know what I am saying? haha
    I tried looking into the E-M1 and it seems like the E-M1 II is coming out towards the end of the year?

  • $1,000 including lenses and other accessories, or $1,000 for the body only?

    If you meant all-included, the E-M5 II is out of your price range (and the E-M1 II will be much significantly more expensive so that's out too).

    If you're okay with micro four thirds sensors, this looks like a great deal to me: amzn.com/B01CIXJK16

    That bundle includes both a kit zoom (which you'll probably use for most things) and a lens that will be great for full-length portrait photography and even things like wildlife photography if you're into that sort of thing.

    Anyway, I can't really advise whether you should look into other types of cameras or not without knowing what "extra features" you need or what your priorities are. There are certainly other good cameras out there and I have not looked into it for a while — if I were in your shoes I would need to start at the beginning and do a lot of research before making a decision. When I originally recommended the E-M10 I was confident that was hands down the best choice, but that was awhile back.
  • $1,000 including lenses and other accessories, or $1,000 for the body only?

    If you meant all-included, the E-M5 II is out of your price range (and the E-M1 II will be much significantly more expensive so that's out too).

    If you're okay with micro four thirds sensors, this looks like a great deal to me: amzn.com/B01CIXJK16

    That bundle includes both a kit zoom (which you'll probably use for most things) and a lens that will be great for full-length portrait photography and even things like wildlife photography if you're into that sort of thing.

    Anyway, I can't really advise whether you should look into other types of cameras or not without knowing what "extra features" you need or what your priorities are. There are certainly other good cameras out there and I have not looked into it for a while — if I were in your shoes I would need to start at the beginning and do a lot of research before making a decision. When I originally recommended the E-M10 I was confident that was hands down the best choice, but that was awhile back.
    $1,000 for the body. Well, I've honestly been super happy with all the recommended products from the supply list and anything else recommended from the site. I have been looking into the cameras a bit more today and yeah, I should probably build my way up. So, my last question is this: if you had to update the recommended camera to buy on the buying guide for cameras on the site, what would it be? And thank you so much for all of your help!
  • If you want to spend around $1,000 for the body alone and you think a smaller easier-to-carry camera is a good tradeoff for some image size/resolution and you think very good image stabilization (being able to shoot handheld with less light rather than needing a tripod) is an important feature and you don't want to have to worry about moisture/rain etc, I'd get the E-M5 II: amzn.com/B00S6DBM2S

    Any camera is going to be confusing initially because there are so many features (most superfluous), but the E-M5 II, once you set it up, has what I think is a great control interface for a smaller camera. If you're shooting full manual — and I recommend that — there are two dials at the top, then a switch to the side. With the switch in position 1, one dial controls shutter speed, the second controls aperture; with the switch in position 2, one dial controls ISO, the second controls white balance (WB can be changed later if shooting in RAW, but it's still nice to see what you're doing while shooting sometimes).

    If you want a larger sensor (larger higher resolution images) then you will end up with a larger camera. Higher resolution is certainly nice in some situations, so it really comes down to your priorities. If you want to look into other cameras in your price range, here's a good place to start: dpreview.com/reviews/2016-roundup-interchangeable-lens-cameras-800-1200

    They also do very very thorough reviews of each specific camera (16 pages or so per camera). I don't trust anyone outright but they do a better job than most websites at breaking things down, although it's aimed at more advanced users. Just make sure to note the date on their articles, because what applied in 2013 is likely not applicable now.

    Whatever you get, don't buy lenses until you know and understand your camera's crop factor. I get into this in the guide. If you have questions about that you can ask here.

    I need to update the guide. I know there are some broken links that have been reported and the buying guide is out of date.
  • I purchased a Nikon 5300. I like it pretty much. As one that likes landscapes, I wish I had saved up and bought a full frame camera. O well. Lots of good info and reviews are on this web site: http://www.dpreview.com/  Check it out.
    Get good lenses.  If your not familiar with them, I suggest a visit  to a camera shop or two for info before you buy.  All depends what you are really looking for in an end product as well. A photographer told me; "spend your money on good lenses. A so-so camera with good lenses is better than a good camera with so-so lenses."
  • @davidwwilson. If it aint broke, dont fix it. If your happy with your camera, save your $. ..... Gettin so even  cell phones take nice shots,  like this one I took while I was fishin. Its a JPEG.I  also took a RAW photo with it,  and it looks even better. 
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