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What do you think about this type of alla prima?

edited November 2015 in Painting
Hello, yesterday I found this very talented Dutch artist named Jos van Riswick, who also paints alla prima, but in different style than Mark's. He paints on masonite panels, prepared with Lefranc et Bourgeois gesso. "This type of acrylic gesso has a very subtle tooth to it, which simplifies smudging out brush strokes", he says. 


He explains his way of painting: 

"I try to stay faithful to what I see. If possible I use the sight-size method. This means that you put your subject as close to your canvas as possible, so that one can view both at the same time, without turning the head. 

This method has been applied by many 19th century 'salon' painters, like eg. John Singer-Sargent."


To start, I usually mix a couple of salient colors that I see in my subject, for instance: 2 colors for the background, then a shadow and light color for each object etc... This way I have a mixture that is not too far off any color I will need and I don't have to start from zero each time when I'm painting. Mixtures do have to be adapted continually of course. Making exact mixes is impossible.

Lately, I've been painting on mdf panel al lot. I prepare the panel with acrylic gesso (Lefranc & Bourgeois). Before I start to paint, I apply a thin layer of especially formulated medium on the panel... (50% stand oil / 50% Liquin.) 

The layer of medium gives the paint a homogeneous consistency all over the panel, which I like. The paint can be moved (and removed) easily. My medium is very slow drying, so I can work wet into wet for about 2 days. 

His website ( http://www.josvanriswick.com/ ) is full of striking paintings, such as this one:



And this one: 

His YouTube channel has many demos, like of the painting above and many others.

So what do you guys think of this style of painting? 

I'm posting this because watching his videos you'll see how loose it is, since there is no drawing on the canvas previous to the painting session, and everything is done on about 10 hours or so, according to him. He claims not to know how to draw, by the way. I think this is very interesting.

Cheers.

dencalmikpIrishcajunFlattymichaelkingartwork

Comments

  • Fabrizio

    Yes, clearly beautiful still lifes and quite wonderful portraits.
    I hope Jos van Riswick primes his MDF panels on both sides before he slaps on the gesso.
    i like his methods, particularly "painting into the soup" as he calls it.
    i think you will discover that Mark's method of painting is not what he teaches. What he teaches is to help us to learn about mixing color and seeing accurately. He has said that once we have done a half dozen still lifes with exactly the Carder method that our own styles and techniques should prevail.
    Jos has his "eye in" and can mix color beautifully. I can't do that with any confidence yet and love the color checker and restricted Carder palette. Thanks for posting this work.

    Denis
    FabriziomariebAlberto
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] admin
    edited November 2015
    I really like the way he painted that blue wooden table.
    Fabriziomarieb
  • Yes, very good.  This is a very polished look, which I think requires tons of work.  My first love is a more unpolishedy look like the true masters Repin, Sargent and many others.
    [Deleted User]mikpFabrizioFlatty
  • mikpmikp -
    edited November 2015
    Well, I personally love works of  Jos van Riswick, did some copies of him but I would not say his paintings alla prima. As I recall in some posts he said that some of his works took him longer than you can paint in one day. Also he did challenge of painting day-by-day small objects, you can find his blog and observe his progress there. Great perception of color from beginning.
    I bought 1 video of him which was around 8h and I noticed some instant changes of light (like stop record, start record). However I am not sure if painting next day is considered alla prima too (paint is still fresh).
    I watched almost all of his videos, together with this one paid and: Jos starts from sketch done by brush (not pencil), then power colors, then 'something' - usually background, he mixes edges of objects with background a little so there is no way that white spots will occur. Then he makes painting looking like 'wow' ;-) and that's just half of his movies because then he starts to work on details. Well, I think he is one of masters of our time. 

  • I really enjoyed watching the video's. I remember buying a book with step photos of how to get the finished painting. I painted several "layers" brown first then yellow then pink to eventually get a red poppy. I couldn't understand why I or anyone else would go "all around the world " so to speak with layers instead of just putting down the colour that was required in the first place. When I discovered The Carder Method, now renamed Draw Mix Paint, it made so much sense.His level of expertise is obvious and the detail is incredible. It is all about "seeing". 
  • While his work may not be to evrerones taste I think his work achieves a high level of realism and is excellent it's certainly not Alla Prima. As Kingston has said, way too finished. Out in the air with about 2 hours befor the sun changes the way everything is lit, you paint fast and a little loose! But hey that's a beautiful piece of work!
    EstherHKaustav
  • It was probably a variation of the Flemish Method, in which you do about 7 layers. The first one is the umber layer after your drawing, then the grisaille, then you start to add colours and glazes and scumbles until you get the desired effect. It's a very laborious method because it can take up to 2 months to complete a painting due to the drying time of each layer, but very effective for luminance and shadows. 
    justcurious
  • edited November 2015
    Please, don't get me wrong, I think visible brushwork is wonderful. 

    My favourite painting in the entire world, La Blanchisseuse, is ridden with it.



    Here's a Singer-Sargent that I also like, because of how simple, yet effective, it looks:



    I just wanted to show that other style of alla prima (although the term seemed to have cause controversy, I still think it is alla prima because he doesn't work on dry layers. He might work on more than one session, even putting the painting inside of the freezer during intervals, but the same applies to many others who work alla prima) and how fascinating it is that the artist is able to get that extraordinary amount of details while painting on super cheap surfaces like cardboard and masonite.

    Anyway, cheers.

    On a sidenote, My Venice Turpenine has finally arrived, so I'm a little bit closer to try the DMP method. Just waiting on the paints, now, to set up the studio.
    Summer
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] admin
    edited November 2015
    I really like both of those paintings as well. While I like the way Riswick painted that table as I mentioned before, I probably would not come back to that painting, but these two you posted (by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Sargent, respectively) I could look at again and again.

    It's too bad there is not a good photograph online of the first one. I found another (see below) that has its own problems, but you can see just how different two photographs of the same painting can look. I wish there was a standard for photographing/processing images of paintings, a good standard that actually represented paintings somewhat accurately… it wouldn't be that hard, but it's simply not the case — the problem with the cameras/computers is they have human operators.  :s   And it's really a shame because many of the artists are no longer with us, so they have no control over it.


    FabrizioRonSummersome
  • ElizaEliza -
    edited November 2015
    I like what appears to be the usage of a split complimentary color scheme, however, he does not use a limited palette.  
  • edited November 2015
    Eliza said:
    I like what appears to be the usage of a split complimentary color scheme, however, he does not use a limited palette.  
    No, according to his website, he uses these paints, from Old Holland:

    1) Titanium White, 2) Scheveningen Yellow Lemon, 3) Cadmium Yellow Deep, 4) Scheveningen Red Light, 5) Alizarin Crimson Lake Extra, 6) Dioxazine Mauve, 7) Ultramarine Blue Deep, 8) Transparent Oxide Red, 9) Scheveningen Green, 10) Sap Green Lake Extra, 11) Wijnranken Black or Payne's Gray.


    He told me that he finds canvases to be too rough and not appropriate to be used when the artist wants to look at the painting from up-close, and that is why he paints on cardboard. 
    Summer
  • Thanks for posting the videos and additional explanations.  The variety and input we get on this forum from everyone are some of its greatest strengths.

    Fabrizio
  • Informative images!
  • Fabrizio said:
    Eliza said:
    I like what appears to be the usage of a split complimentary color scheme, however, he does not use a limited palette.  
    No, according to his website, he uses these paints, from Old Holland:

    1) Titanium White, 2) Scheveningen Yellow Lemon, 3) Cadmium Yellow Deep, 4) Scheveningen Red Light, 5) Alizarin Crimson Lake Extra, 6) Dioxazine Mauve, 7) Ultramarine Blue Deep, 8) Transparent Oxide Red, 9) Scheveningen Green, 10) Sap Green Lake Extra, 11) Wijnranken Black or Payne's Gray.

    I think his color schemes are lovely.  

    However, my understanding of a limited palette only includes the following colors: Cad Yellow (light), Alizarin Crimson, Ultramarine Blue, Burnt Umber and White (Titanium or Zinc).

    He uses Titanium White, 2 Cad yellows, 4 reds, 2 greens, Ultramarine Blue, Black and Gray.  It seems he uses several power colors.  

    His split complimentary color schemes could possibly be mixed with the limited palette I mentioned.  
  • While I admire his technical proficiency, if I wanted a painting like that I would simply buy a camera.  For my personal taste, such paintings lack soul or life.
  • I enjoy seeing both styles of work, highly refined and loosely painted. I think there is a place for both. To me van Riswick's work is more about the subject than the paint or it's application. He spends a good deal of time and effort to get the paint out of the way of the viewer. In a looser style the painting is as much about the paint, sometimes more about the paint, than it is about the subject. Nothing wrong with either of those approaches or goals. Personally I do not think his paintings look like photographs. They are sweeter, richer and juicier in a way that is different from a photograph and the juicy paint of a looser style. Saying something looks like a photograph has just become the common standard of expressing a certain level of realism. But I have always felt a painting can be photographic without looking like a photograph. The sad irony to me is that the artist can be so successful at removing the paint, many people don't really see the painting.
    some
  • The most critical thing I think is using panel. Panel is superior to canvas.
  • I think Riswick draws better than he thinks he can. 
  • Cardboard is not the best Ito use as base for painting since it will be subject to weather.
  • @Fabrizio (david too) , thanks for posting the La Blanchisseuse. 
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