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I have a Construction question - help?

I have always dreamed of my own art studio and was looking at these shed kits they sell. Some of them are pretty cool for studios or guest houses. I was looking at a two story loft. I have an area that is about 50 feet from the house that sits on a hill with a great view.

Question - we are on a septic tank. Would it be pricey to have plumbing to the building? It is a distance from the house. I asked my husband last night and he gave me that look.

I'd appreciate any thoughts cause I really really wanted to do this. Thanks, tj

Comments

  • Where I live, it's pricey to add a sink in the next room.
  • tjstjs -
    edited July 2013
    I'm in the U.S. so lots of codes and permits. I wanted to do a full small bath. It's the septic tank I'm wondering about. Is this costly to do? Ours for the house is a great distance so I was thinking it would be easier to add another one? Don't know :(
  • you do need to check city codes, in some places if your shed in set up on blocks and not on a slab, no permits needed, but that's only for the shed. Your saying two story & bath, you'll most like have to have permits, & electrical permit. Maybe you should have it built to your specs. , establish where you want the light to come in, etc. If the septic tank is between the house and the shed, I don't believe it could be hooked up properly. Check with your local septic tank companies first. I would love to have a 10-12 ft ceiling. Good luck
  • It would cost. Excavation and relandscaping. Can you add a bath to current septic system. A septic system can be as much as 30k. Better the walk to the house. Electric is cheaper but still some minor excavation. Tapping into the box. Are you zoned rural? Many questions to answer.
  • I live in the middle of no where! After I posted this I found this site http://www.costowl.com/home-improvement/plumbing-septic-system-cost.html#.Ud8wEUG1GSp

    Digging for the septic tank wouldn't be a problem with regards to landscaping cause there isn't much over there. I was going to have it landscaped afterward.

    I know it sounds extravagant but with MS I can't travel. I miss all holidays and parties. Rarely can I go someplace. So for me this would be like a vacation just to spend the day away from this house! As far as using the bathroom in the house? Not a good idea for me.

    I found this one site with some really cool shed kits. http://www.shedsunlimited.net/TwoStoryShedsandGarages.html

    There's a lot of them out there. My favorite is the Tiny Texas House site. I love what they do :) http://tinytexashouses.com/

    Do any of you know of anyone that has bought one of these shed kits? Thanks for you help :)
    Castillo
  • @tjs any of those sheds would make a sweet art studio. These are some of the ideas I like for a future studio space, maybe next week once I win the lottery :-j
  • Tj, I think that's a great idea. Must have a bathroom for sure. I like those little Texas homes. Cute! Make sure it has a porch :)
    Castillo, I like that fourth room a lot.
  • the 4th one I like, well it's nice to dream, have the porch and sip a good cup of coffee as the sun rises. enjoy
  • tjstjs -
    edited July 2013
    I just love those spaces Castillo.

    Right behind where I want this is the coolest barn that I want soooo bad to build a studio in. It's huge. Two and half stories high all open with the best loft and great beautiful old milled wood. It's forty feet long! My husband will not relinquish it. Right now he has it crammed with just junk ~X(

    I did find the old doors and windows that belonged to the original 1890 homestead and was planning on using these plus the old brick. Still would look better on that old barn. Makes me mad :((
  • Oh my gosh - the barn sounds perfect...hmmmm, there's got to be a way around this dilemma. Is the barn not up for discussion at all, or could there be a tiny bit of wiggle room for negotiation?
  • I'm working on that! He is really into white water rafting and has 1/3rd of his gear in there plus other junk that needs to go to the dump. The rest is in the garage and another huge garage. There are so many buildings on this property and I can't get it into his head to make use of the space and get organized.

    I think my only option is to call that show "Hoarders" =))

    So for me building my own studio/apartment is the easiest answer to my problem husband! Plus I just think it would be cool. But that barn? It would be the best. The guy that built this house built the barn to mill his own logs in there so it has a great history.
  • Yep, sounds like a studio/apartment is a good solution. It sounds like you live in a beautiful spot for a studio - how cool that the builder milled his own logs on the property. I love the Northwest!
  • edited July 2013
    tjs said:

    I'm working on that! He is really into white water rafting and has 1/3rd of his gear in there plus other junk that needs to go to the dump. The rest is in the garage and another huge garage. There are so many buildings on this property and I can't get it into his head to make use of the space and get organized.

    I think my only option is to call that show "Hoarders" =))

    So for me building my own studio/apartment is the easiest answer to my problem husband! Plus I just think it would be cool. But that barn? It would be the best. The guy that built this house built the barn to mill his own logs in there so it has a great history.

    Don't call hoarders, call those picker guys on the history channel.

    If it's cold where you live you will need to set the septic line below the frost line. I'm in Long Island and that's 4 feet deep here. When we trench at work it runs $18.00 a foot plus materials and we only go 18 inches deep (not plumbing). It can run into some money. If the house is old and the septic system is old, you may be opening a can of worms by disturbing it. Sometimes they do collapse and cave in. There is much to take into consideration. It might just be cheaper to build an extension on your house or even a atrium sun room type of addition. Can your heating and air conditioning systems handle the extra square footage? You have to weight the property tax liabilities too. I worked in a building supply for 6 years. Things can come up that are totally unexpected and run into lots of money real quick. Hate to be a kill joy but you really need to go into a venture like this with both eyes open and prepared for the unexpected.
    The barn does sound really cool though. I keep telling people when I retire I just want a barn with a woodworking shop and an art studio on a couple of acres in the mountains in New Hampshire. That would be all I need (and a cot). :D
    Where I live now, you need a building permit to change your front door. I hate it here. No way I'm going to retire here.
    tjs
  • tjstjs -
    edited July 2013
    Your state sounds like my state! But we do live in such a remote location that no one is ever out here and most people do build under the radar ;) Even so you do have to be careful cause the last 10 years we have a lot of transplants from the city that have moved out here and they seem to love to tattle on people.

    But I think I could get away with something that looks like a shed. It's just digging for the septic tank and you are right about unexpected costs. If I lived by Liz none of this would be a problem. She'd know what to do and could get it taken care of for me :D
  • we have a lot of transplants from the city that have moved out here and they seem to love to tattle on people.
    Heck TJ don't be so tough on them thar city folk. Yer talkin to a hundred of em right here.

    Denis
  • dencal said:

    we have a lot of transplants from the city that have moved out here and they seem to love to tattle on people.
    Heck TJ don't be so tough on them thar city folk. Yer talkin to a hundred of em right here.

    Denis




    :)) I am a transplant city folk gal! I love the city and miss it so much. But what I hate are tattle tales! We have this great fire pit area that is beautifully landscaped. We had huge rocks and boulders brought in and had a cool staircase out of them leading up to the area I want to put the studio and a dry pond. One spring night two years ago we had a campfire. No burn ban. Someone called the fire department and said there was illegal burning going on. Two large fire trucks showed up and an inspector.

    It was ridiculous plus we are surrounded by two state campgrounds. That must really drive these people nuts!

    Hey I just found a site with an alternative to a flush toilet. Sounds nasty though. Not sure I could handle it.

    http://www.biolet.com/store/
  • edited July 2013
    I don't know if it is relevant or helpful for you, but here in Houston you can avoid building codes, inspections, and higher property tax if the size is under a specified number of square feet (shed), or if the structure is on wheels or on skids. So a lot of people buy worn out box trailers like the kind pulled by eighteen wheelers to haul cargo, or by buying shipping containers. They place them on their property and turn them into storage rooms, and in some cases they turn them into offices. My next door neighbor has turned a truck trailer that is about 40 ft long into a storage unit for his horse supplies, and on both sides of it he has attached a shed-type roof where the horses can go to get out of bad weather or the hot sun. The other advantage is that is that these sorts of structures are more easily moved or removed if necessary. It's not hard to put in windows, skylights, extra doors, etc. I'd put a septic tank close by to save on costs. My uncle used to make septic tanks for camper trailers people parked in his hunting and fishing camp by simply digging a hole with a small backhoe, then he'd drop an old steel 55-gal. drum inside that had a bunch of 1-inch holes punched into it all over, and cut a bigger hole on one side to slide a flexible sewer line into it. Then he'd fill it all in with a bunch of river cobbles, gravel, and sandy soil. They worked fine until the drum rusted away...nowadays a plastic drum could be used.
  • edited July 2013
    tjs said:

    ...Even so you do have to be careful cause the last 10 years we have a lot of transplants from the city that have moved out here and they seem to love to tattle on people....

    I heard the best story a few weeks ago. This guy is telling someone his friend smokes a lot of pot. He likes to smoke it on the porch of his house. One day a neighbor is walking by and says "you smoke a lot of pot. I smell it all the time". The guy on the porch says my grandfather lived till he was 95. The neighbor asks from smoking pot? He replied "no, from minding his own *&$%ing business! =)) I thought it was great!

    tjs
  • Newb I love that! I'm gonna pass that one on :)) That is great!

    CharleyBoy I looked at those storage container houses. Some of them are so cool. The problem for me would be getting it up there cause of the lay of the land. Then I looked at a company out of Tacoma and Seattle that say the construct pods? They weren't bad either but enormously expensive.

    I've found a couple good sites with information on how to live off the grid. They have some good options.
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