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Daniel Greene Color theory

This is the last from 8 videos about his color method .He has  some interesting points,some I found a bit complicate .

Comments

  • I think I understand what this video is trying to say. The problem is, I "think" I understand what this video is "trying" to say.

    Mark's videos are super clear, very actionable. What I mean is, I don't think Mark's "color theory" is different from anybody else's. But his instruction is superior.

    I read an article about Frank Reilly, who was apparently a well known art instructor at the NY Artist League in the early 20th century and taught something that sounds very similar to what Mark teaches. He was regarded as one of the best art instructors of the time because his teachings were thorough and clear and had reproducible results.

    I read about and watched videos about color theory and mixing paint for a year before I found Mark's videos. After the first free 90m video, my jaw hit the floor and I tried a painting using just the basics of what he taught and painted something I couldn't believe. Every time I paint now I feel like I'm learning something.

    After learning from Mark, other videos are starting to make sense to me and the more I paint, the more confident I am that I can paint, and that I can learn more easily, etc.

    Anyway, I guess what I mean is, try Mark's method and see if that makes things clearer. It certainly has for me.
    edwardtjsjcdr
  • Thank you rgr, I appreciate that.

    I was explaining something to my wife the other day as we tried to measure counter tops (we are installing granite counter tops ourselves). She could measure and calculate and get a clear picture in her head how to do the whole project. While dummy me has to write everything out in detail. I was explaining to her that that is why I came up with my teaching method. I simply never could understand anything myself unless I break it down into super simple steps.
    rgrtjs
  • Before I came here, I read bunches of stuff on color theory and mixing and charts and palettes and was just paralyzed by information overload. I'm glad to have put that behind me using this method so I can load up my head with important minutiae on things like composition and the golden ratio. >:)
    Mark_CarderrgrmariebConstantine1900
  • Mark's 5 colors makes sens to me too and I stick to them, but I never stop to look to other artists methods, eventually to learn something new and most of the times i go back to what I learn from Mark .
  • I always feel really uncomfortable whenever anyone suggests my method is THE way to paint or anything like that (not suggesting anyone is saying that here). I try to look at it simply as a teaching method, not the method, and certainly not a method anyone should feel chained to as they move forward and develop as an artist.


    valentinMartin_J_Craneshirley_seput


  • In this video at 8: 50 he said black and red makes brown I thought black and red makes dark red .Maybe black yellow and red makes brown and he said black and yellow makes green .I thought makes light greenish brown. We definitely need cool blue and dark orange which complement each other. So 60% ultramarine blue and 40% burnt umber makes absolute sense to me :)
  • So 60% ultramarine blue and 40% burnt umber makes absolute sense to me I mean for black
    Mark_Carder
  • Thanks Kingston .I think most of the colors are just convenient colors but not necessary .
  • I have read that chroma is a color attribute that an artist must understand. I disagree, I think an artist only needs to understand value, (dark-light) yellow, blue, red, orange, purple and green.

    Chroma confuses things to me, I think it just means "how dirty is the color?". But it is always more helpful (to an artist mixing color) to ask, "which is more red, yellow...?", than to ask, "which is more dirty?". I want to know, "dirty in which direction?".
    rgrsue_deutscherjcdrtjs
  • I think that there's one reason to be at least aware of chroma, and that is to think of high-chroma colors as being near the outside perimeter of your color wheel/chart. Why? Because if you need a "pure" primary color, i.e., a high chroma color like pure yellow, blue or red, you need to be aware that, once you have added another color to the pure color, no amount of adding and mixing will ever be able to counteract what you have added and get you back to that place on the outside perimeter of the wheel. IOW, you can't mix a high-chroma primary color.

    Also, you can have two colors of the same value but different chroma. For example, a pure yellow may have the same value as a yellow with white and a little bit of blue added to it.

    That being said, for the most part I just think in terms of mixing the color I need using the steps that you lay out in the vids.

    I have read that chroma is a color attribute that an artist must understand. I disagree, I think an artist only needs to understand value, (dark-light) yellow, blue, red, orange, purple and green.

    Chroma confuses things to me, I think it just means "how dirty is the color?". But it is always more helpful (to an artist mixing color) to ask, "which is more red, yellow...?", than to ask, "which is more dirty?". I want to know, "dirty in which direction?".

  • It's incredibly easy to over-think color theory. I've had several different instructors and books give me countless palettes with 10 or 15 different colors. This was always very confusing to me and my paintings were all over the place color-wise; No unity or cohesiveness at all. Then I started using the simple 5 color palette that Mark talks about and it makes a world of difference. Mixing is much simpler now and the color in the paintings have unity.

    I think you could branch out to more complex methods like this guy is talking about, but you have to have a good handle on basics first.
    rgrMartin_J_Crane
  • edited August 2013
    You can make brown from cad red light and ivory black. give it a try. You can make a purple from alizarin and ivory black. One is an orange red and other is a blue red.
    valentin
  • It was a great revelation to me that, using Mark's 5 colors, I could come come up with beautiful colors and, more importantly, I could duplicate them easily in the next painting session. I believe this was because you only had 5 "starting points" (as opposed to 20 or so with multiple shades of blue, red and yellow) from which to triangulate to the right hue, intensity and value. After a few weekends of painting with only those 5 colors, however, I found it useful to still have other colors on hand to get to a final nuance for a color. This might be "cheating"! I can say though that starting with the 5 colors has made me much more confident about controlling the colors on my canvas.
    dencal
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