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My plein air gear.

edited May 17 in Post Your Paintings
So all of them are now tested and used for about a year or more. Just thought of sharing about what do I carry now with me.

Thumb box: three mdf panels; a lot of brushes, as it is not possible to clean them all the time. Five/six used tubes of titanium white, cad lemon, cad orange, yellow ochre, crimson, cobalt blue; small palette knife; tissue paper box and baby wipes in the car. Small nylon and used bristle brushes.



Pochade box: two 8x10 thin mdf panels. White, cad lemon, cad orange, yellow ochre, alizarin crimson and cobalt blue. An old squeeze medicine bottle for linseed turps mixture although never used it. Small nylon watercolor and used bristle brushes. antenna Mahl stick, tissue, clips and a strap to attach the box around waist. Palette knives. I am actually carrying a lot less. Tissue box, baby wipes and tripod stool in the car; used on need basis.




A Mabef alternative easel: this is for bigger canvases, e.g. 12X16 and above. The above palette box is needed for supplies. Palette ans canvas were attached easily. Brushholder, cleaning rag, turp can and painting knives are attached as shown. Wide legs can withstand a lot of wind pressure. I don't use much medium. If I need thin paints then I can use some turps from the can. Oil can be used separately.


Watercolor: much more flexible setup. Unique thing is that the box carries both opaque and transparent colors. Sketchbook, double headed brushes, water dippers, waterbrush; pencil, eraser, tissue etc. are also there. All of these can be used on need basis.

PaulBSummerjeffHaikuRoxyBOB73Renoir
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Comments

  • PaulBPaulB mod
    I started going out on weekends for plein air painting.  I have been overpacking the gear, taking way too much. I'm still getting used to the setup, the portability, sunburn, etc. I hope to get my working set of stuff whittled down to the amount you have.

    People keep telling me I need a folding chair, umbrella, snacks, drink... way too much stuff.
    jeffBOB73
  • SummerSummer -
    edited May 15
    Wow!  @Kaustav, this is the finest setup I have ever seen.  These pic will probably influence a lot of plein air painters who see them.  As an aside, hope you don't mind me sharing a plein air experience I just had a few hours ago.  I watched a plein air painter handle the bug problem in one of his videos.  What do you do about them?  First of all he ignored it completely for a long time as he continued to lecture to his class and paint.  A few minutes later, another bug landed.  Wow, this is getting interesting.  I was really curious about this time to see what he was going to do.  What did he do?  Without breaking stride lecturing or painting he suddenly grabbed both of them with his brush and mixed them into the paint already on the canvas. First time I've ever seen that.  I learn something new every day.  Thank you so much for sharing these pictures.  I'm learning sooooooo much.   :)  Summer 
    critterisfun
  • PaulB said:
    I started going out on weekends for plein air painting.  I have been overpacking the gear, taking way too much. I'm still getting used to the setup, the portability, sunburn, etc. I hope to get my working set of stuff whittled down to the amount you have.

    People keep telling me I need a folding chair, umbrella, snacks, drink... way too much stuff.
    @PaulB its all about what you need and what you dont. I dont like to stand for hours so have tripod chair. Its lower than usual but ok. I have water in my car and localities everywhere so I can buy food etc. If you dont then you need snacks. I dont need umbrella as i change the box angle slightly to avoid the sun but need a cap.
    jeff
  • @summer thats funny!  =) i havent faced this problem much as I am painting mostly in the city. But a mosquito roll on could be useful. With thumbox and pochade box i can paint even inside the car.
    jeff
  • Kaustav said:
    @summer thats funny!  =) i havent faced this problem much as I am painting mostly in the city. But a mosquito roll on could be useful. With thumbox and pochade box i can paint even inside the car.  I knew you'd have it under control.  I doubt the conservators will even notice because he did such a thorough job of mixing.  I'm going to keep that in mind to do that myself if I need to.  The values still have to be right though.  ;)
    Kaustav

  • I'm noticing your vertical palette.  I have one.  You seem to know how to use it expertly.  I can't make it work with Geneva paints but I can with other brands.  You know David Kassan, well I bought one of his when he was selling them.  I don't think that he is selling them any longer.  I simply love the one that I bought from him though.  I keep it on an adjustable tripod as I see that you have yours on one as well.  I believe that David experimented with different styles but yours is quite interesting and unique.  Do you paint from it in the same position that is shown in the pic?  Is it versatile and removable as well?  Thanks.

    Summer
  • Outstanding setup for a outstanding artist, oh I wish I was living in your area. Looking forward to seeing your work 
  • edited May 18
    @summer its my palette in the pochade box shown above. I forgot to show that the box goes with the easel. I saw that another US artist attached a palette vertically.
  • edited May 15
    jeff said:
    Outstanding setup for a outstanding artist, oh I wish I was living in your area. Looking forward to seeing your work 
    Oh. With a little thinking you can also do the same. Its nothing. Nature helps you to paint. We learn by doing it ourselves and not by looking at others.
    Bancroft414HaikuRenoir
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Summer said:
    I can't make it work with Geneva paints but I can with other brands.
    I have the same experience.  Geneva is a studio paint.  If I use it plein air (I tried), it slides around on the palette if it's not perfectly level, and it never is.  If I try to squeeze out paint beforehand, the easel is a box of brightly colored soup on arrival.

    So I got some traditional paint and medium.
    Bancroft414
  • Ok @PaulB what does it matter? You can buy 4-5 paint tubes and paint. To me it seems that a white, cad yellow light, cad orange, quinac magenta, cobalt blue are enough. Keep Pthalo green in the bag and wait for it to be used.
    PaulB
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    It doesn't matter.  But I've got expectations with paint and the pigment load, and my substitute pigments are not nearly strong enough to make my color mixing easy.

    So I have a cad yellow deep that is really strong, and a cerulean blue that is very weak.  I jsut need to get used to mixing those.  Same rules apply though.
    Kaustav
  • Great setup, thanks for sharing @Kaustav.

    I've attempted plein air several times and have convinced myself I really should enjoy it. Though I tend to paint slowly, so that makes the process seem like a slog. Plus my first attempt, I had about 40 pounds of gear and another 3 pounds of fluids as it was a hot day, and I hiked down about 300 feet in elevation to get setup. Was nice until I had to hike back up!

    Having the vehicle close would be ideal. 
    KaustavHaiku
  • Thanks @KenR find something to paint near your home. I guess it is better to have a cycle or a motorbike rather than a car. Finding a suitable parking near the subject is the most difficult thing.
    Bancroft414Haiku
  • Kaustav said:
    Ok @PaulB what does it matter? You can buy 4-5 paint tubes and paint. To me it seems that a white, cad yellow light, cad orange, quinac magenta, cobalt blue are enough. Keep Pthalo green in the bag and wait for it to be used.
    Thank you for sharing your color recommendations!
  • PaulB said:
    It doesn't matter.  But I've got expectations with paint and the pigment load, and my substitute pigments are not nearly strong enough to make my color mixing easy.

    So I have a cad yellow deep that is really strong, and a cerulean blue that is very weak.  I jsut need to get used to mixing those.  Same rules apply though.
    Add a small amount of PB15:3 (Phthalo Blue - Green shade) to your cerulean blue.
    PaulB
  • @PaulB do you have a color palette in mind for outdoors? If yes then please share.

  • How do you not get that paint from your gear on the car? ;)
  • @Richard_P By thinking of my wife's face  :p

    Bancroft414Renoir
  • @Richard_P But she's gotten used to it. There's paint everywhere in our new flat and she doesn't react anymore. Besides my boy has done large artworks on all the walls!  :# She can't manage two of us. 

    BoudiccaSummerRenoir
  • edited May 17
    I need to make two panel carriers for the future. Need two boxes for 5X7 and 8X10 panels. Also ordered some sticks which can be glued onto the walls of the box to separate the panels. 





    SummerBancroft414Dougie2346Renoir
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Kaustav said:
    @PaulB do you have a color palette in mind for outdoors? If yes then please share.
    Not yet.  I have a bag with lots of paint tubes in it, and I intend to narrow it down to a handful.  Currently it has:

    burnt umber
    cerulean blue, cobalt blue, prussian blue
    viridian green
    magenta, rose permanent
    dioxazine violet
    cad yellow deep, cad yellow light, naples yellow
    titanium white

    I'll narrow it down soon, and swap out for stronger pigment where necessary.
    Richard_P said:
    How do you not get that paint from your gear on the car? ;)
    I also have paint on the steering wheel.

    Kaustav said:
    Also ordered some sticks which can be glued onto the walls of the box to separate the panels.
    I have a carrier that has gaps spaced such that two panels fit in the same slot, back to back.  
    KaustavSummer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited May 18

    What do you think about this palette for plein air.  I've been watching this fellow paint en plein air with these paints for months now--landscapes and portraits.  He is very particular about where he puts his warms and cools as well as the details for distance.  He puts the earth colors in his sky colors and the sky colors in his earth colors.  Really amazing how this works for him.  With the help of a lot of  Liquin Original, he paints a landscape or portrait in two day without a reference photo or traditional under drawing.  A few marks with his brush with purple oil paint are all that he allows himself to begin a painting which has been prepared earlier on board, only with a ground and stain.  Summer    

    Natural Pigments W&N Flake White, largest tube

    W&N Lemon Yellow, cool

    W&N Cadmium Yellow Medium, hot

    W&N Cadmium Orange

    W&N Cadmium Red Light, hot

    W&N Cadmium Red Medium, neutral

    Grumbacher Thalo Red Rose, transparent, cool

    W&N Cobalt Blue

    W&N Yellow Ochre

    W&N Raw Sienna

    W&N Burnt Sienna

    W&N Terre Verte

    Rembrandt Turquoise Blue #522

    Holbein Permanent Green Deep, cool





  • PaulBPaulB mod
    @Summer, I don't have enough plein air experience to know what a good palette is yet. My instinct says that this is very large and doesn't need the reds.  I defer completely to @Kaustav.
    SummerKaustavDougie2346
  • SummerSummer -
    edited May 18
    Originally, I thought that he had all of these colors on his palette for looks, but I watched him use every one of them so far and I have another year to go with him--giving him room to add more.  I was sure some of his mixes were pure mud, but when he applied the "mud", it was perfect.  Hmm. 
  • Summer said:

    What do you think about this palette for plein air.  I've been watching this fellow paint en plein air with these paints for months now--landscapes and portraits.  
    Are you observing him live or online? Who is this magician?
  • Summer said:

    What do you think about this palette for plein air.  I've been watching this fellow paint en plein air with these paints for months now--landscapes and portraits.  
    Are you observing him live or online? Who is this magician?
    His name is Jon Houglum and I purchased his DVDs--all of them--haha.  He is an interesting artist so I discipline myself to watch one or two chapters every morning with coffee.  Summer
  • edited May 18
    @Summer @PaulB

    Look the thing is what colors do you need depends totally on where you are painting. So, it is a personal thing. If you are in the tropical region you may need more loud colors, pthalos, cobalt teal etc. If I go to hills/snowy hills in India then I must go for B.umber, pthalo green and ultramarine. Where I live white, yellow, orange, red and blue are enough because its a city and has a village. I began to take yellow ochre as I find it more useful than taking a brown. I can mix a brown in no time (orange+blue). 

    After doing a few I can say that Plein air painting needs a lot of thinking about what do you need. It needs a bit more originality rather than following others too much. This is a personal experience and the tools should be chosen accordingly. It takes guts to accept that we don't need that many things in life after all. :)
    SummerRenoir
  • PaulB said:
    Kaustav said:
    @PaulB do you have a color palette in mind for outdoors? If yes then please share.
    Not yet.  I have a bag with lots of paint tubes in it, and I intend to narrow it down to a handful.  Currently it has:

    burnt umber
    cerulean blue, cobalt blue, prussian blue
    viridian green
    magenta, rose permanent
    dioxazine violet
    cad yellow deep, cad yellow light, naples yellow
    titanium white

    I'll narrow it down soon, and swap out for stronger pigment where necessary.
    Richard_P said:
    How do you not get that paint from your gear on the car? ;)
    I also have paint on the steering wheel.

    Kaustav said:
    Also ordered some sticks which can be glued onto the walls of the box to separate the panels.
    I have a carrier that has gaps spaced such that two panels fit in the same slot, back to back.  
    @PaulB ;take the most powerful colors such as titanium white, cad yellow light, cad yellow deep, quinac magenta. Take both cerulean and cobalt blue as I don't know what is the climate like in where you live. Prussian and Pthalos are a difficult to handle outdoors. Give them a try. Maybe take a brown for drawing. You'll realise a lot while doing. 

    Buy a pochade box that has panel slots. If you are not going on a 7 Day plein air trip so you don't need panel carriers at the moment. One good painting is good enough for a day.  :) 
    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited May 18

    Ooh goodie!  My hour with Houglum this morning includes the bonus of listening to a real babbling brook in the background as he explains the old masters' device of painting a partial frame-within-a-frame at the bottom of their paintings in the same direction the light source is coming from to cause the viewer to have to look over that hurdle before looking further into the painting.  He is classically trained. And, Tischler has a new plein air video out.  He and his buddies get to locations I can only dream about.  I guess that is why I find learning from plein air painters intriguing.  I agree that different locations and even times of the day in those locations require different colors on the palettes.  But, I wouldn't want to be out on location and have to borrow a smidgen of whatever from a mate.   By the same token, a mate could need tad of color from me because her/his color has dried or gone missing.  I'd probably carry more tubes of paint than necessary for these reasons.  Just saying.

    Thanks for all your insights, questions and comments and especially this thread.  Great plein air setup Kaustav, could not be better (unless your substrates were 3mm aluminum panels covered with linen or Rustoleum--haha).   

    Summer

    Kaustav
  • All paintings would have to be facing inward to keep insects from getting trapped in wet paint probably.  Nice try though for the idea.  :)
    Kaustav
  • Yeah, I guess there's a period of time with  all inventions where the bugs need to be worked out.
    KaustavRenoirBancroft414
  • edited May 21
    @BOB73 and @Summer I got the plastic box shown above. Waiting for the sticks to arrive. So, the 5X7 carrier will be built very soon. The other ones are the things of the future.

    An office colleague just showed my a great place called Pachmari to paint with 5X7 thumbox. Just look at the pictures. I would need a carrier for these trips

    https://www.google.com/search?q=Pachmarhi&safe=off&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjakabhwKniAhVRAXIKHfXiAZoQ_AUIDigB&biw=1366&bih=625#imgrc=_

    SummerBOB73
  • Pack up for  Pachmari. Beautiful even if you ignore the enhanced photographic effects. Forget 5x7, take a suitcase full of 18x24 or bigger and whole tubes of paint.
    Kaustav
  • edited May 21
    BOB73 said:
    Pack up for  Pachmari. Beautiful even if you ignore the enhanced photographic effects. Forget 5x7, take a suitcase full of 18x24 or bigger and whole tubes of paint.
    @BOB73 My wife and I planned to go there during monsoon! :) I wish I could take the big ones but I'm not matured enough to handle all those in public. If I get even five good sketches and good references then I would feel lucky. I hope there aren't too many people at that time!  :) 
  • paint the people too! 
  • BOB73 said:
    paint the people too! 
    I can...for the sketches but I feel I developed Cezanne syndrome!  :p Don't like too many people these days. 
  • edited May 21
    Summer said:

    What do you think about this palette for plein air.  I've been watching this fellow paint en plein air with these paints for months now--landscapes and portraits.  He is very particular about where he puts his warms and cools as well as the details for distance.  He puts the earth colors in his sky colors and the sky colors in his earth colors.  Really amazing how this works for him.  With the help of a lot of  Liquin Original, he paints a landscape or portrait in two day without a reference photo or traditional under drawing.  A few marks with his brush with purple oil paint are all that he allows himself to begin a painting which has been prepared earlier on board, only with a ground and stain.  Summer    

    Natural Pigments W&N Flake White, largest tube

    W&N Lemon Yellow, cool

    W&N Cadmium Yellow Medium, hot

    W&N Cadmium Orange

    W&N Cadmium Red Light, hot

    W&N Cadmium Red Medium, neutral

    Grumbacher Thalo Red Rose, transparent, cool

    W&N Cobalt Blue

    W&N Yellow Ochre

    W&N Raw Sienna

    W&N Burnt Sienna

    W&N Terre Verte

    Rembrandt Turquoise Blue #522

    Holbein Permanent Green Deep, cool





    I would perhaps just use a warm and Cool of each colour, check out Marc dalassio’s videos, For me I would get in a mess with all those colours, I use titanium white for plein air because I want a more opaque white
  • @Dougie2346 ;  Thanks for your comment.  I will check out Marc's videos.  I probably should say that Jon started out with just a few colors for en plein air.  What he is using now is after years and years of painting en plein air and I suspect he is still experimenting with new paints and brands.  Not on the list above is Viridian green, for example, which he is suggesting that we use, but he doesn't have it on his palette--yet.  He says that he chose the ones above, especially Cobalt Blue, because in his classes, students don't have a lot of money to spend on paints.  When he began his career, he used Lead White with abandon.  I have some of those videos when he did--haha.  Now it is too expensive even for him to purchase he says.  Just some other things to think about.  Summer
  • paint the people too! 
    Kaustav
  • edited May 23
    Added these today. Works very good with washers and wing screw. Now it's perfect.

    Renoir
  • I have been poring over your post, @Kaustav to glean some nuggets of wisdom both from a practical and a philosophical viewpoint.

    I just ordered my very first Pochade Box! I've wanted one for over a year now but they are so expensive and since I am not at all handy, making one of my own was not to be. 

    @Kaustav, I noticed you use the little metal brush bucket. Do you use that to contain paint thinner for when you are done? I have had the misfortune of using such a thing while painting and ended up with a very muddy painting.

    Do you ever use your SDM paints or do you use paints straight from the tube? I've seen plein air artists use a palette where they put their colors in little pots on the outside edge of the palette then they basically mix on the brush straight onto the canvas.

    Would you mind sharing exactly how you do this? I'll figure out colors, as you say, your color palette depends on where you are to paint. I live in the midwest where there are beautiful green fields, trees, barns, rivers and lakes, and big skies, but we also get lively skies as you do when a storm comes through. 

    I so enjoy your posts and your paintings, you really trust your heart and what your environment presents to you.

    Thank you for any suggestions you may have.
    SummerPaulB
  • edited June 3
    @renoir ; Hi thanks for liking my work. Sharing my techniques is a treat too. Successful plein air painting needs a good pochade box but painting is a different thing altogether. I dont use any medium while outside. But a quick drying oil or alkyd may do the trick. I use the turp container to clean my brushes and nothing more. If I need turps initially to do drawing I can use from it to cover the canvas but reat is just paint. I don't use SDM paints but regular stuff. I put my paints on the top of my palette and use it whenever required as shown in the photos. See the video link below for details:


    SummerPaulB
  • Kaustav, Pachmari looks like a great place for getting good reference pics and doing a bit of plein air.
  • tassieguy said:
    Kaustav, Pachmari looks like a great place for getting good reference pics and doing a bit of plein air.
    Yeah...I want to go there...but problem is again...people  :# too many people. But we are quite taken by that place. 
  • Even if there are lots of people you can still take refererence photos and if you don't want the people you can remove them in an image editor. I have found that it's not possible to do big, realistic landscape paintings en plein air with the weather and light changing all the time. So take photos and perfect them in your image editor and then use them to create big, marvelous Indian landscapes in the studio. A really good free image editor Is GIMP.   I love your landscapes.  :)
  • @tassieguy thanks. I also do all of that wth photoshop and MS Paint and finding a good photograph is certainly great. However, my method has changed somewhat in the last few months. 

    I do outdoor sketches to get the actual perspective and colors that mostly dissapear in photos. For details I use the photos. Even after the initial sketch I make a bigger sketch to find out problems. I make a lot of changes in this. But the basis remains that first small sketch.
    Renoir
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