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Mediums and solvents?

Hi, I'm new to oil painting! I would like to know what mediums and solvents you guys use and for what purpose? I don't have a very good idea of what linseed oil turpentine etc. does to paint or if its harmful to breathe in? I'm looking for something that can make my "georgian oil" paints.
•slow drying
•glossy 
•smooth/ easy to use. And non toxic. 
Any feedback helps! Thanks!

Comments

  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Welcome.  Check out Mark's videos and supply lists, and you'll find you can work with no mediums or solvents, or you can mix your own SDM.
    cadia
  • Thanks ! and I have been watching a lot of his videos. The thing is I want to get my paint like his "Genava paint" using mediums. Hopefully one day I can get a few of his tubes. I just really like all the characteristics his paint has.
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Great.  Go find the SDM recipe on the supply list and that should do it.

  • Welcome to the Forum

    Mark’s brand of paint called Geneva is smooth, non toxic, highly pigmented, slow dry and premixed with medium.

    Here are Mark’s recipes for his slow dry medium for use with other brands of oil paint.

    There are currently no mediums on the market that slow the drying rate of oil paint adequately, so you will need to make it yourself.

    recipe for slow-dry medium (for all colors except titanium white):

    • 10 parts odorless mineral spirits (any artist-grade odorless mineral spirits will do)
    • 5 parts stand oil or linseed stand oil (this is viscous like honey and is not the same as refined linseed oil)
    • 1 part refined linseed oil
    • 5 parts Venice turpentine *
    • 2 parts oil of cloves †

    For burnt umber, you will need extra clove oil. Please watch this video for instructions on how to incorporate the extra clove oil into burnt umber: youtu.be/lpU9egKu-kM

    recipe for slow-dry medium for titanium white:

    • 10 parts odorless mineral spirits
    • 1 part stand oil or linseed stand oil
    • 5 parts refined linseed oil
    • 5 parts Venice turpentine *

    Venice turpentine is not at all the same as what is commonly known as "turpentine", a solvent commonly used by artists many years ago (and still used by some artists today). Venice turpentine, on the other hand, is simply tree sap — a thick resin which is thick like honey.

    † Oil of cloves is sold as "clove leaf oil", "clove bud oil", or simply "clove oil" — any of these forms is fine. You may try looking for it in drug stores, health food stores, or from an online supplier.

    Here is a video tutorial on mixing paint with medium: youtu.be/lpU9egKu-kM

    Odorless mineral spirit is toxic and you can substitute with a citrus solvent.
    Gamblin has a non toxic medium.

    Drying oils such as linseed and walnut are used to dilute/thin the stiff tube paint (mfrd with 30 to 50% oil).
    Oil improves brushability, blending, mixing and fine detail strokes. When dry oils form a tough, flexible surface.

    Solvents such as oderless mineral spirit, act as a dispersant for the pigmented oils and rapidly  evaporates when they have done their work, ideally leaving no residue.

    Clove oil retards the speed of drying in the pigmented oils. Gives a week or two for adjustments and additions, compared to a day or two without clove oil. Acts a bit like a solvent, no residue and evaporates over the two weeks.

    Venice Turpentine (larch tree resin 100%) improves gloss, brushability, smoothness and durability.

    Denis





    misael71
  • Thank you for the information!
  • What solvent is used in Geneva paints?
  • JMcCulloch

    from Mark’s description;

    Geneva Artists' Oil Color is premium-grade artists' paint. We do not add driers to our paint or to the medium we mix into it, and therefore it dries slowly and remains wet on the canvas for about 5 to 10 days (depending on the pigment, paint thickness, and ambient temperature). In general, Geneva paint was formulated to benefit artists who like to work alla prima (wet-in-wet).

    • Made with the highest-grade pigments and finest artist-grade linseed oil
    • Ready to use — already has slow-dry medium incorporated into it
    • High pigment load
    • No toxic fumes from driers and solvents
    • Forms a durable long-term paint film
    • Thoroughly tested
    • 100% made by us in our workshop in Austin, Texas — click here for photos of the team at work


    Denis

  • edited April 25
    The slow-dry medium recipe contains mineral spirits.  Is this not classified as a solvent or is he using some other recipe... I'm looking for a non-toxic substitute since I have allocated a spare bedroom to work and it is not well ventilated. The citrus solvent I found at our local Jerry's storefront requires a well ventilated area.
  • The slow-dry medium recipe does contain mineral spirits because tubed paint already contains thickeners.

    Geneva paints are made from pigments and oils and so don't need either thickeners or solvents.
  • The slow-dry medium recipe contains mineral spirits.  Is this not classified as a solvent or is he using some other recipe... I'm looking for a non-toxic substitute since I have allocated a spare bedroom to work and it is not well ventilated. The citrus solvent I found at our local Jerry's storefront requires a well ventilated area.
    You may be referring to the product made by The Real Milk Paint Co.  You might get opinions from other members about this particular citrus solvent.  I use it, and only this brand made by The Real Milk Paint Co.  And I believe that Denis uses and recommends it as well and he is the expert and probably the person who first recommended it to me.  The problem I'm having is that not enough time has elapsed for me to say for certain that it is okay to use as a product and/or to use with or without ventilation.  I'm thinking I need another fifty years to be sure.  For me, anything that gives me a high makes me suspicious--no matter how much I love that effect!  I use this product a lot where solvents are required and with ventilation but I can't say for certain that both are best practices.

    Summer  
  • As far as I understand it, all solvents are toxic in the air to some extent (apart from water which is a solvent).
  • edited April 25
    Help me properly understand the product description.
    Check me if I have made a wrong assumption:

    Bullet 2 of the product description says Geneva Oil Color contains "slow-dry medium".

    Examining the recipe, I see that slow-dry medium contains mineral spirits (a solvent).

    Bullet 4 says "No toxic fumes from driers and solvents"
    How could Geneva Oil Color have no toxic fumes from solvents when slow-dry medium is an ingredient that contains solvents?
  • As I said the medium recipe is for tubed paint. They don't use this recipe in the Geneva paints:

    "oil paint

    If you are in the United States, Europe, or Canada, I recommend a set of my own Geneva Artists' Oil Color, which is already mixed with the perfect medium for each color and requires no further preparation. It performs better than other brands, is easier to work with, and contains no solvents (no mineral spirits and no turpentine) so there are no toxic fumes to worry about. It is the perfect limited palette for painting realism."


    For shop bought tubed paint (Winsor & Newton, etc..)

    "medium recipes

    There are currently no mediums on the market that slow the drying rate of oil paint adequately, so you will need to make it yourself.

    recipe for slow-dry medium (for all colors except titanium white):

    • 10 parts odorless mineral spirits (any artist-grade odorless mineral spirits will do)
    • 5 parts stand oil or linseed stand oil (this is viscous like honey and is not the same as refined linseed oil)
    • 1 part refined linseed oil
    • 5 parts Venice turpentine *
    • 2 parts oil of cloves †

    For burnt umber, you will need extra clove oil. Please watch this video for instructions on how to incorporate the extra clove oil into burnt umber: youtu.be/lpU9egKu-kM

    recipe for slow-dry medium for titanium white:

    • 10 parts odorless mineral spirits
    • 1 part stand oil or linseed stand oil
    • 5 parts refined linseed oil
    • 5 parts Venice turpentine *

    Venice turpentine is not at all the same as what is commonly known as "turpentine", a solvent commonly used by artists many years ago (and still used by some artists today). Venice turpentine, on the other hand, is simply tree sap — a thick resin which is thick like honey.

    † Oil of cloves is sold as "clove leaf oil", "clove bud oil", or simply "clove oil" — any of these forms is fine. You may try looking for it in drug stores, health food stores, or from an online supplier.

    Here is a video tutorial on mixing paint with medium: youtu.be/lpU9egKu-kM"


  • SummerSummer -
    edited April 26
    Is there clove oil in Geneva Paints?  Clove oil is a solvent.  Answer: "Geneva paints are made from pigments and oils and so don't need either thickeners or solvents."  as stated by @Richard_P above.   :)
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