Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

You can send an email to [email protected] if you have questions about how to use this forum.

Gamblin Cold Wax Medium

SummerSummer -
edited March 10 in Painting
Good morning folks.  The weather here is perfect for varnishing and I can't seem to stop myself from trying this varnish on a painting simply because I'm curious.  Probably tomorrow after I get feedback from you guys.  Thanks.  Summer

Here is what I am using with a soft lint-free cloth:

A soft paste formulated to knife consistency, Gamblin Cold Wax Medium is made from naturally white unbleached beeswax, alkyd resin, and odorless mineral spirits (OMS), and is used to make oil colors thicker and more matte. ... Cold Wax Medium contains no oil, so it can be applied as a wax varnish over a dry oil painting.

Comments

  • Summer

    Not used it, but I predict you will find it a bit dull and underwhelming.
    Does it protect?
    ls it removable?
    Does it unsink the earth colors?
    Will it wear off?
    Does it yellow?

    Denis
    Summer
  • Im sorry, I'm still seeking therapy after my Gamvar trauma, and the beading.
    And every time I removed it and tried again it was the same.

    A bit like Groundhog day only with varnish.

    Im just trying to get on with life now.

     :) 



    SummerDianna

  • Thanks.  I will get back to you on every consideration you have listed.  Here is a quote from the label on the can.  Still considering adding Gamblin OMS and spraying it on.  Bracing for an overall cloudiness. 

    "Gamblin Cold Wax medium is an oil painting medium made from naturally white unbleached beeswax and odorless mineral spirits (OMS).  Cold Wax Medium is the only painting medium that makes oil colors thicker and matte.  Use it to create impasto and to make oil colors, painting mediums & varnishes more matte.  Gamblin Cold Wax Medium is formulated to knife consistency & can be thinned to brush consistency by adding OMS.  To make oil painting materials more matte, dissolve 1 tablespoon of Gamblin Cold Wax medium to 2 fl. oz of Gamblin OMS.  The resulting solution is the matting agent which can be added as a dilutant.  Gamblin Cold Wax Medium contains no oil so it can be applied as a wax varnish over a dry oil painting."

    I'm trying it on a painting that I want to paint again but this time on aluminum.  And, it is just for our home and won't ever be for sale.

    Thanks, @Richard_P ;  I came across that article about a month ago but it was good to read it again.   :)

    @MichaelD ;  Hope my experiment will make you feel better.  :#

    Summer

      

     

    MichaelD
  • Thanks @Summer, I am looking forward to reading how it all goes :-)
    Summer
  • I have done oil paintings with cold wax medium and finished off with a layer of the cold wax.  You can gently "polish" it with a very soft cloth.  It will give a soft sheen to the painting.  The paintings I did were about 20 years ago and they have not yellowed at all.
    Summer
  • Thanks for commenting, @oilpainter1950.  So you did two things, used cold wax as a medium in the paint during the painting process, and as a varnish afterwards.  I may not be so successful with just the varnishing layer, or layers, without having first mixed wax with the paints, but we'll see.  The painting has been drying for years, so I have that in my favor.  :)  Summer  
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Alright, I have the same portable table, and I want your drill press.  Also, I know your painting!

    When you say that the sunken areas have been remedied, do you mean remedied separately with oil, or remedied with the application of cold wax medium?

    Summer weather?  It's 9 Fahrenheit here tonight.
    Summer
  • Beautifully organised workshop
    Summer
  • PaulB said:

    When you say that the sunken areas have been remedied, do you mean remedied separately with oil, or remedied with the application of cold wax medium?

    Summer weather?  It's 9 Fahrenheit here tonight.
    I suspect that you will have a drill press when the time is right.

    To my amazement, the Gamblin Cold Wax Medium application solved the sinking-in which was major on this painting.  And, it did not require any oiling out.  I do have to say though that this painting was extremely dry--years!

    71 degrees Fahrenheit here this afternoon.
    PaulB
  • Just a friendly FYI: your paper mask provides negligible protection from the VOCs in the OMS. The worst news about OMS is that the toxins are oderless, but they are present. The recommended personal protection will include a half mask with charcoal filters. The MSDS for your OMS will describe the recommended equipment. Personally, I use ventilation to remove most VOCs and no respirator.
    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited March 8
    @Kodiakwood ; Thanks for your reminder about personal safety.  I agree that my paper mask provides negligible protection from the VOCs in the OMS.  I, too, use ventilation to remove most VOCs and am doing so in this situation but the several doors open to the outside for cross ventilation cannot be seen in this photo.  I wear this particular mask when I think that I have all of my safety precautions covered and can let my guard down--cause you never know.   :)   Summer  
    Kodiakwood
  • SummerSummer -
    edited March 9
    Update.  I took a look at the painting today and it is perfect to be put back in its frame tomorrow and return to its place on the wall in my studio.  I'm pleased that the colors and values look correct now and the painting is more unified.  It was also super easy to do.  End of experiment.  Thank you everyone for giving me the courage to try it.  Summer  :)
    PaulBMichaelD
  • Scary. I don't think I would have the courage to do it. But I'd love to see a photo of your painting if you can take one that will somehow show the finish.
    Summer
  • I have a jar of cold wax medium that I never intended to use.  However, after reading this thread, I probably will try it as a final varnish. 
    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited March 9
    Thanks, everyone, for your interest.  My aim is to use the gloss varnishes but for those, I'm not going to use completed paintings.  Instead I'll use color samples which are already drying.  This afternoon I'll take a photo of the one on which I used cold wax medium and post it here--showing the finish.  Restoring the sunk-in colors and giving the painting a "total" unity is primarily what I was after, and it did that.  I like the soft patina as well.  And, IT WAS SOOOO EASY!  Next, I'm going to try spraying the wax onto another painting to avoid the swirls, but they don't bother me.  Summer 
    PaulBBOB73
  • Dianna said:
    Scary. I don't think I would have the courage to do it. But I'd love to see a photo of your painting if you can take one that will somehow show the finish.
    Thanks for looking.  I'll upload a photo later today showing the finish at it's worst.  I'd like to try diluting the wax with OMS and spraying it on another painting to avoid the swirls but that sounds like less fun.  The swirls aren't bothersome to me compared to the other issues that were resolved with this method of varnishing. 

    Summer
    PaulBDianna
  • I have a jar of cold wax medium that I never intended to use.  However, after reading this thread, I probably will try it as a final varnish. 
    I hope this thread will give you enough information to make your final outcome a happy one without any surprises.

    Summer
    PaulB
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Thank you @Summer for demystifying this crazy goop!
    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited March 10
    Here she is in her permanent place in our home on day three, all varnished and framed.  I have to consciously look for the swirl marks to see them and they are only visible if I contort my angle of view in an unnatural position.  Gloss varnishes also have their telltale angles.  I will be using this product again if I'm looking for a matte finish.

    Summer




    KaustavBoudicca
  • Summer said "Here is an excellent read before using a wax varnish."
      does it matter if CWM was not used as a medium during the actual painting process? and How is it like WD-40 for the knees?

    Summer
  • BOB73 said:
    Summer said "Here is an excellent read before using a wax varnish."
      does it matter if CWM was not used as a medium during the actual painting process? and How is it like WD-40 for the knees?

    You bring up a very good point about whether the cold wax medium works better if it was also used as a medium in the painting.  I did not use the wax as a medium in the painting, just afterwards as a varnish.  I feared I would not get as good a result as @oilpainter1950 who used the product both as a medium in her paints and afterwards as a varnish.  We are both pleased with the results.

    Summer
    BOB73
  • SummerSummer -
    edited March 10
    Folks, I certainly did not foresee the long journey this painting and I would be taking from start to finish when I signed up with DMP four years ago.  This painting has seen it all.  It was my first painting using the DMP method and at the same time an entry into one of our challenges.  Then I stored it away for drying--years ago--while I learned more about photography, image processors, framing and varnishing, etc.  It took me this long to get my act together with regard to this painting.  And, the varnishing had to coincide with the weather.  What a journey we have been on.  I think it is true in art as in love, we always remember our first.  This first one is now finished.  Thanks, everyone, you were in on every step!  Summer 
    PaulBtassieguy
  • Hi @dencal, Denis

    Thank you for your list of considerations.   :)   I considered your questions and prediction over and over again while applying this varnish and will keep them in mind for the future.  Here are the yes and no responses based on my own experience, reading about others experiences, and familiarizing myself with the manufacturers claims. 

    I predict you will find it a bit dull and underwhelming. - I'm finding that some paintings look better with a matte finish.   
    Does it protect? - Yes.
    ls it removable? - Yes.  Can be removed and a new application applied.  One member has not had to remove or replace in 20 yrs.
    Does it unsink the earth colors?  - Yes.  Yes.  Yes.  I'm so pleased with this one.
    Will it wear off? - No.  Can be removed and a new application applied.
    Does it yellow? - No.  One DMP members observation after 20 yrs.

    Summer
    dencalBOB73
  • Summer

    Thank you for this response.

    A supplementary question.

    One of the dramatic differences Mark demonstrates using gloss compared with mat varnish is the saturation of black paint obtained with gloss. I imagine CWM to be in the middle of these extremes.
    Any advice or photos?

    Denis

  • SummerSummer -
    edited March 13
    @dencal ; Denis, Yes, I was remembering Mark's observations about the differences in the saturation of black when using the two types of varnishes.  That's why I was surprised and thankful I used a matte varnish on this particular painting.  Just got lucky.  The black on the body of the dog would have leapt off the painting creating a 3D effect had I used a gloss varnish.  Even now, having used the matte varnish, the black in that part of the painting is almost too saturated.  I used Geneva black, the chroma version that I mixed myself.  But certainly Mark is right about considering how the varnish used will affect the blacks and other dark colors in a painting.  I will be testing beforehand next time.  Thanks for bringing this to light.  Summer
  • Your studio looks so great! :+1:

    For beeswax We don't/can't paint like this today but you'll see how beeswax was used by Turner along with megilp for super-shiny reflective colors. This is great medium for 19th c techniques.

    See it here after 43:32 



    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited March 13
    Interesting scientific discovery about how Turner mixed his paints.  Megilp.  I believe that artists today are experimenting with varying degrees of linseed oil. lead acetate, mastic varnish, turpentine, dried resin from the mastic tree.

    Gamblin sells a product called Neo-Megilp that will create a reflective surface when dry.  A product like this would give a glossy uniformity to all of the colors I'm guessing.  Would a varnish even be necessary given the glossy level of the paint film after using Megilp?  I have read that professional cleaning would not be possible when varnish is intermixed with paints.  Something to think about.
     
    Isn't Liquin Original more matte when comparing the two--Liquin Original with Megilp?  I have had some, but very little experience with Megilp and Liquin.  Now I'd like to know more.

    Thanks @Kaustav ;

    Summer


    Kaustav
  • @Summer I feel that keeping mediums simple is better! These days I use mostly oil paint with a slight touch of linseed oil. But will gradually move towards more quicker drying natural option such as quicker drying paints and sun thickened oil. No worries about gloss when varnishes are there.

    If you like matte surfaces then beeswax is enough! Otherwise one single medium like neo-megilp is enough to make paints move. No need to add varnishes to oil paint (I did it though  :p  ).

    The neo-megilp looks pretty solid compared to the gels like Maroger, Rublev Italian Varnish etc. Turner needed beeswax to create textures and used Megilp to make the paint shiney as beeswax makes it matte. They also used resins and other stuff like egg shell, egg whites, bitumen etc. for various effects. We don't do these things any longer.
    Summer
  • @Summer ;  Does it leave a white ring if you leave a damp glass on it? :)
    tassieguySummer
  • edited March 14
    This is all sounding horribly complicated. I keep my medium real simple. Usually, I just use oil paint straight from the tube.  When dry I varnish. That's it. Easy peasy.  Would there be any archival problems with this?  :)
  • Rob

    Undiluted paint from the tube would make skies and black backgrounds difficult and expensive.
    Undiluted paint would make fine details and linework impossible.
    There would also be sidetracks on your brushstrokes and lumpy end strokes
    Glazing would be out of the question.
    I would expect to see varnished glossy lumps,  reflecting light from everywhere.
    Perhaps Langridge is premediumed in the same way as Geneva?

    Denis

    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited March 14
    dencal said:

    Rob

    Undiluted paint from the tube would make skies and black backgrounds difficult and expensive.
    Undiluted paint would make fine details and linework impossible.
    There would also be sidetracks on your brushstrokes and lumpy end strokes
    Glazing would be out of the question.
    I would expect to see varnished glossy lumps,  reflecting light from everywhere.
    Perhaps Langridge is premediumed in the same way as Geneva?

    Denis



    Thank you Denis for describing my current painting.  I thought these aspects of a painting were desirable.  And, I've managed to get all the things you describe with Geneva.  Hmm.  You're good at lists.   ;)   Summer
    dencal
  • Summer

    Yes. All of these attributes are desirable, only when you want them, but not as unavoidable characteristics of everything you do.

    Denis
  • Denis,

    Whew!  Thank you for clearing that up.  I see that I have more to think about.

    Summer 
  • SummerSummer -
    edited March 17
    Kaustav said:
    @Summer I feel that keeping mediums simple is better! These days I use mostly oil paint with a slight touch of linseed oil. But will gradually move towards more quicker drying natural option such as quicker drying paints and sun thickened oil. No worries about gloss when varnishes are there.

    If you like matte surfaces then beeswax is enough! Otherwise one single medium like neo-megilp is enough to make paints move. No need to add varnishes to oil paint (I did it though  :p  ).

    The neo-megilp looks pretty solid compared to the gels like Maroger, Rublev Italian Varnish etc. Turner needed beeswax to create textures and used Megilp to make the paint shiney as beeswax makes it matte. They also used resins and other stuff like egg shell, egg whites, bitumen etc. for various effects. We don't do these things any longer.
     @Kaustav ; I don't want to miss anything, but what do you mean exactly by "But will gradually move towards more quicker drying natural option such as quicker drying paints"  Alkyds?  I've begun to use alkyds, which are made with alcohol, acids, and resins.  Is this what you mean when you say quicker drying paints?  Or, the umber earth colors that are naturally quicker drying.  And, maybe even some of the manufactured hues, rather than the natural ones?  Maybe I have answered my own question.   :)      

    Summer
Sign In or Register to comment.